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Film Board should leave radios alone – The Star, Kenya

The Kenya Film Classification Board has told MPs that it will report some radio and TV stations to the DCI for running gambling games (see P8).The Film Board is supposed to licence the showing and production of movies in Kenya. On-air betting should be monitored by the Betting Control and Licensing Board or the Communications Authority of Kenya.There are many simple games with cash prizes on FM radio stations operated by companies like Radio Africa (the majority shareholder of the Star). These games give away cash to a listener who correctly answers a question or who is the first to phone in when a certain song is played.This is not gambling because the listener does not have to pay anything to enter. There is no money stake.However some media houses do run games or lotteries where listeners or viewers do have to pay to enter. That can legitimately be considered gambling and should indeed be restricted or regulated.But that regulation should not be done by the Kenya Film Classification Board. There is already too much overlap among government bodies trying to carve out a space for themselves. Quote of the day: “It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.” François de La RochefoucauldThe French author was born on September 15, 1613

The Kenya Film Classification Board has told MPs that it will report some radio and TV stations to the DCI for running gambling games (see P8).

The Film Board is supposed to licence the showing and production of movies in Kenya. 

On-air betting should be monitored by the Betting Control and Licensing Board or the Communications Authority of Kenya.

There are many simple games with cash prizes on FM radio stations operated by companies like Radio Africa (the majority shareholder of the Star). These games give away cash to a listener who correctly answers a question or who is the first to phone in when a certain song is played.

This is not gambling because the listener does not have to pay anything to enter. There is no money stake.

However some media houses do run games or lotteries where listeners or viewers do have to pay to enter. That can legitimately be considered gambling and should indeed be restricted or regulated.

But that regulation should not be done by the Kenya Film Classification Board. There is already too much overlap among government bodies trying to carve out a space for themselves. 

Quote of the day:It is easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.”

François de La Rochefoucauld
The French author was born on September 15, 1613

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Why Covid Has Broken Parents’ Sense of Risk – The New York Times

Every decision for not-yet-vaccinated kids feels like an unsolvable equation.There was a brief, shining moment in early summer when the decisions around Covid and my family felt manageable. My husband and I were vaccinated and had returned to some of our favorite indoor activities, like stand-up comedy shows and the gym. Our kids were at a mostly outdoor day camp with procedures we trusted, and the local case rate was low.But as July bled into August, and the threat of the Delta variant increased and news about breakthrough infections emerged, my understanding of the risk of a given activity for any of us — but especially my 8- and 5-year-olds, who are too young to be vaccinated — went completely haywire.A mundane question we faced was: Should we let our kid go to a play date with a new friend? Well, let me just check the case rate in this ZIP code and multiply it by the number of pediatric hospitalizations, then subtract the loss of joy and normal socialization my child will undergo by missing out on yet another typical childhood experience.2020: Can I go running?2021: My brother is a fully vaxxed Scorpio who only lies and my roommate is an unvaccinated INTJ who only tells the truth; how do we attend a 124-person outdoor wedding across a river with a fox, a chicken, and a sack of grain, and only one mask?— Ed Yong (@edyong209) August 13, 2021
I would have predicted that this renewed level of uncertainty would make me more anxious, the way I had felt for most of 2020. But instead I have been pretty numb about it all, bombarded with too many statistics and too many confusing choices to feel anything other than dead inside when confronted with a new decision. It’s like all my old ways of considering risk levels are completely broken.I wanted to understand why I was having this response, which felt counterintuitive, so I talked to psychologists who have researched risk. What I learned was that my brain has become so taxed by all the heavy-lifting around virus decisions that I became indifferent out of self preservation. And I’m not alone.As Paul Slovic, the president of Decision Research, a nonprofit institute that studies decision-making, and a professor of psychology at the University of Oregon, explained: Assessing new information is difficult mental work, and “the brain is lazy.” It is particularly hard for people to assess risk and act with compassion when we are bombarded with numbers, or as Dr. Slovic put it: “Our feelings don’t do arithmetic very well.”Citing the work of Daniel Kahneman, the Nobel Prize-winning economist and psychologist, Dr. Slovic explained that we think in two fundamentally different ways about risk: fast, and slow. “Fast thinking is intuitive, relying on our gut feelings, which come to us very quickly when our attention is turned to some issue.” The feelings tend to be broadly positive or negative, but they boil down to: Should I be afraid of this thing or not? “When we have feelings that are validated through experience, then experience is a very sophisticated and reliable mechanism for helping us get through our day.”Slow thinking is more analytical. “It’s a more deliberative process,” said Ellen Peters, the director of the Center for Science Communication Research and a colleague of Dr. Slovic’s at the University of Oregon. It involves reading, analyzing numbers and thinking hard. This can lead to better decisions in some scenarios, but sometimes, “The world is so complex, we end up spinning our intellectual wheels,” Dr. Peters said. It’s also a more recent phenomenon in evolutionary history — our ancient counterparts were not thinking slow, they were worrying about the grizzly bear outside their hut. Dr. Slovic offered a hypothetical situation to illustrate how our feelings don’t always line up with the onslaught of modern facts: We are likely to be quite upset if we hear about two Covid cases at our child’s school, but we probably won’t be doubly as upset if we hear that there are four cases. As Daniel Kahneman explained in his book, “Thinking, Fast and Slow,” “the amount of concern is not adequately sensitive to the probability of harm.”Since we have been dealing with the virus for 18 months, we may no longer react the way we typically do when we hear more bad news. In these scenarios, some parents will overestimate the risk to their children, Dr. Peters said. But others will experience a phenomenon called “psychic numbing,” which Delia O’Hara of the American Psychological Association described as the “indifference that sets in when we are confronted with overwhelming calamity.” Psychic numbing sounds much more poetic than “dead inside,” and I appreciate that I’m not the only one who feels this way, because I no longer trust my emotions to guide me properly.As parents hurtle into the fall, not knowing when a vaccine might be available to our younger kids, how do we cope with uncertainty and get past our numbness? There is no magic solution that will fix our sense of unease — we are in a pandemic still, it’s normal to feel uneasy. But having at least some sense of control about the choices we are making is key, Dr. Slovic said. One way to take back that control is “to listen to the experts who you feel are really knowledgeable and you can trust, whether they are local or national,” he said. “You should follow their advice and hope for the best.” In our case, that means sending our kids back to school in their masks, and crossing our fingers.Another way to bring back a measure of control over the risk in your life is to try to think ahead of time about what your values are, and to game out moments where multiple values might be in conflict, Dr. Peters said. The example she gave was a family gathering: You might deeply value your children seeing extended family members, but you also do not want your unvaccinated kids to get exposed to Covid. Thinking about these trade-offs early “may seem more of an emotional and cognitive burden, and it is, but you will be steadier in the long run if you think about it ahead of time,” she said.Something I find personally soothing is reminding myself that I can’t iron out the danger for my children in every situation. Part of maturing is learning to assess risk, and even though it can be painful to watch your kid bound out into the dangerous world, it’s the only way they can grow.After some discussion, my husband and I did allow our older daughter to go on the play date with that new friend this summer. We felt comfortable with the Covid risk at that point, and our daughter was beyond excited to go to her friend’s house. About 10 minutes into the play date, we got a call from the father of the house. The kids had been jumping off the top bunk, and my daughter cut her head on a ceiling fan.Though she bled profusely, she was ultimately fine, and she learned the hard way that jumping off the top bunk is a truly idiotic idea. While we warned her about Covid safety, we didn’t think to talk to her about hurling her body from a great height. She had to experience that risk alone.

Every decision for not-yet-vaccinated kids feels like an unsolvable equation.

There was a brief, shining moment in early summer when the decisions around Covid and my family felt manageable. My husband and I were vaccinated and had returned to some of our favorite indoor activities, like stand-up comedy shows and the gym. Our kids were at a mostly outdoor day camp with procedures we trusted, and the local case rate was low.

But as July bled into August, and the threat of the Delta variant increased and news about breakthrough infections emerged, my understanding of the risk of a given activity for any of us — but especially my 8- and 5-year-olds, who are too young to be vaccinated — went completely haywire.

A mundane question we faced was: Should we let our kid go to a play date with a new friend? Well, let me just check the case rate in this ZIP code and multiply it by the number of pediatric hospitalizations, then subtract the loss of joy and normal socialization my child will undergo by missing out on yet another typical childhood experience.

I would have predicted that this renewed level of uncertainty would make me more anxious, the way I had felt for most of 2020. But instead I have been pretty numb about it all, bombarded with too many statistics and too many confusing choices to feel anything other than dead inside when confronted with a new decision. It’s like all my old ways of considering risk levels are completely broken.

I wanted to understand why I was having this response, which felt counterintuitive, so I talked to psychologists who have researched risk. What I learned was that my brain has become so taxed by all the heavy-lifting around virus decisions that I became indifferent out of self preservation. And I’m not alone.

As Paul Slovic, the president of Decision Research, a nonprofit institute that studies decision-making, and a professor of psychology at the University of Oregon, explained: Assessing new information is difficult mental work, and “the brain is lazy.” It is particularly hard for people to assess risk and act with compassion when we are bombarded with numbers, or as Dr. Slovic put it: “Our feelings don’t do arithmetic very well.”

Citing the work of Daniel Kahneman, the Nobel Prize-winning economist and psychologist, Dr. Slovic explained that we think in two fundamentally different ways about risk: fast, and slow. “Fast thinking is intuitive, relying on our gut feelings, which come to us very quickly when our attention is turned to some issue.” The feelings tend to be broadly positive or negative, but they boil down to: Should I be afraid of this thing or not? “When we have feelings that are validated through experience, then experience is a very sophisticated and reliable mechanism for helping us get through our day.”

Slow thinking is more analytical. “It’s a more deliberative process,” said Ellen Peters, the director of the Center for Science Communication Research and a colleague of Dr. Slovic’s at the University of Oregon. It involves reading, analyzing numbers and thinking hard. This can lead to better decisions in some scenarios, but sometimes, “The world is so complex, we end up spinning our intellectual wheels,” Dr. Peters said. It’s also a more recent phenomenon in evolutionary history — our ancient counterparts were not thinking slow, they were worrying about the grizzly bear outside their hut.

Dr. Slovic offered a hypothetical situation to illustrate how our feelings don’t always line up with the onslaught of modern facts: We are likely to be quite upset if we hear about two Covid cases at our child’s school, but we probably won’t be doubly as upset if we hear that there are four cases. As Daniel Kahneman explained in his book, “Thinking, Fast and Slow,” “the amount of concern is not adequately sensitive to the probability of harm.”

Since we have been dealing with the virus for 18 months, we may no longer react the way we typically do when we hear more bad news. In these scenarios, some parents will overestimate the risk to their children, Dr. Peters said. But others will experience a phenomenon called “psychic numbing,” which Delia O’Hara of the American Psychological Association described as the “indifference that sets in when we are confronted with overwhelming calamity.” Psychic numbing sounds much more poetic than “dead inside,” and I appreciate that I’m not the only one who feels this way, because I no longer trust my emotions to guide me properly.

As parents hurtle into the fall, not knowing when a vaccine might be available to our younger kids, how do we cope with uncertainty and get past our numbness? There is no magic solution that will fix our sense of unease — we are in a pandemic still, it’s normal to feel uneasy. But having at least some sense of control about the choices we are making is key, Dr. Slovic said. One way to take back that control is “to listen to the experts who you feel are really knowledgeable and you can trust, whether they are local or national,” he said. “You should follow their advice and hope for the best.” In our case, that means sending our kids back to school in their masks, and crossing our fingers.

Another way to bring back a measure of control over the risk in your life is to try to think ahead of time about what your values are, and to game out moments where multiple values might be in conflict, Dr. Peters said. The example she gave was a family gathering: You might deeply value your children seeing extended family members, but you also do not want your unvaccinated kids to get exposed to Covid. Thinking about these trade-offs early “may seem more of an emotional and cognitive burden, and it is, but you will be steadier in the long run if you think about it ahead of time,” she said.

Something I find personally soothing is reminding myself that I can’t iron out the danger for my children in every situation. Part of maturing is learning to assess risk, and even though it can be painful to watch your kid bound out into the dangerous world, it’s the only way they can grow.

After some discussion, my husband and I did allow our older daughter to go on the play date with that new friend this summer. We felt comfortable with the Covid risk at that point, and our daughter was beyond excited to go to her friend’s house. About 10 minutes into the play date, we got a call from the father of the house. The kids had been jumping off the top bunk, and my daughter cut her head on a ceiling fan.

Though she bled profusely, she was ultimately fine, and she learned the hard way that jumping off the top bunk is a truly idiotic idea. While we warned her about Covid safety, we didn’t think to talk to her about hurling her body from a great height. She had to experience that risk alone.

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Joan Washington, Dialect Coach to the Stars, Dies at 74 – The New York Times

She taught Barbra Streisand, Penélope Cruz and countless other performers how to sound like someone else.Joan Washington, an acclaimed dialect coach who taught Penélope Cruz to sound Greek, Jessica Chastain to sound Israeli and an entire cast of British actors to speak like Brooklyn Jews, died on Sept. 2 at her home in Avening, England. She was 74.Her husband, the actor Richard E. Grant, announced her death on Twitter. He later said the cause was lung cancer.In a career spanning four decades, Ms. Washington developed a reputation as a sort of reverse version of Henry Higgins, the elocutionist who taught Eliza Doolittle the King’s English in George Bernard Shaw’s play “Pygmalion.” She instructed actors to speak not just in national dialects but also in regional and local lilts, even historical ones.She taught actors for most of Britain’s leading national and regional theaters; if a British performer appeared onstage speaking a thick American patois — say, in Neil Simon’s “Brighton Beach Memoirs” — there was a good chance it was Ms. Washington’s handiwork.She also worked on a steady stream of films. She teamed up with Ms. Cruz for “Captain Corelli’s Mandolin” (2001), Ms. Chastain for “The Debt” (2010), Kate Beckinsale for “Emma” (1996) and the British actress Thandie Newton for “W.,” Oliver Stone’s 2008 take on the life of George W. Bush, in which she played Condoleezza Rice, the former U.S. national security adviser.Jessica Chastain in a scene from “The Debt” (2010). Ms. Washington trained Ms. Chastain to sound Israeli for that movie, in which she played a secret agent.Laurie Sparham/Focus FeaturesDialect, Ms. Washington said, was not just about mimicry, about reading a script with an accent. It had to be built into the core of a performance.“A dialect coach must be there from the start,” she told the British newspaper The Independent in 1991. “Otherwise the bad habits are set; it becomes just a bandaging job. There’s enough undoing as it is.”Ms. Washington was something of a performer herself, though never onstage or onscreen. She could instantly adopt whatever dialect she was teaching, and she claimed to have mastery over 124 vowel sounds — just six shy of what Professor Higgins boasted.Though she was born and raised in Scotland, Ms. Washington employed a standard English accent when teaching Americans. She said they brought too many assumptions about what “proper” English sounds like and might be confused by her natural Scottish elocution.“The problem for Americans doing English is that they pronounce their consonants too precisely, which makes it sound rather acquired and middle class,” she said in a 1986 interview with The Sunday Telegraph. “The grander we are, the less we rely on consonants.”Ms. Washington came about her talent thorough research. Before working with actors, she had taught standard English pronunciation at the Royal College of Nursing, whose students arrived from all over Britain and the Commonwealth. Her recordings of their accents formed the basis of a vast library of tapes she kept as reference.She interviewed and recorded older Britons to capture what Liverpudlian or Geordie — an accent from Tyneside, in northeast England — might have sounded like decades ago. To show what English sounded like in the 1910s, she relied on recordings of British prisoners made by Germans during World War I.Her instructional methods were intense. She would often begin by interviewing performers to gauge what they thought a Boston Brahmin or a Warsaw Pole might sound like. She took notes, reams of them, and then handed them to the actors along with copies of her tapes.Over a series of sessions, she would tweak Rs, adjust inflections and suppress unwanted sibilants until an American actress like Emma Stone sounded like an authentic 18th-century English courtier, as she did in the 2018 film “The Favourite.”Barbra Streisand in “Yentl” (1983), the first film on which Ms. Washington worked. She taught Ms. Streisand how to speak like an Ashkenazi Jew in early-20th-century Poland.MGMMs. Washington always worked freelance, but she was most closely associated with the Royal National Theater, where she worked on more than 70 shows. Her first film was “Yentl” (1983), for which she taught the star and director, Barbra Streisand, how to speak like an Ashkenazi Jew in early-20th-century Poland.Ms. Washington had her own theories about accents and where they came from. She said that Britain’s plethora of dialects and accents, all crammed onto a medium-size island, derived from its varying geography and climate.“Cornish is harder and more nasal than Devon because it’s a windy peninsula,” she told The Sunday Telegraph. “If you’ve got the wind in your face, you’ve got to speak without giving much away.”Joan Geddie was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, on Dec. 21, 1946. Her father, John, was a doctor, and her mother, Maggie (Cook) Geddie, was a nurse.When she was 18 she moved to London to attend the Central School of Speech and Drama. After graduating, she taught speech, first at a reform school for girls and then at the Royal College of Nursing.In 1969 she married Keith Washington; they later divorced. Along with Mr. Grant, she is survived by her son, Tom Washington; her daughter, Olivia Grant; and her brother, David Geddie.While teaching, Ms. Washington also picked up side jobs as a dialect coach. In the class-conscious England of the postwar decades, millions of Britain’s expanding middle class sought to erase any trace of their proletarian origins, starting with their accents, which provided her with an abundance of work.Her clients included doctors and clergymen as well as actors — the only ones, she said, who went the opposite direction, seeking instruction on how to sound less posh.She was teaching at the Actors Center in London in 1982 when she met Mr. Grant, who had been born and raised in Swaziland (now Eswatini), in Africa, and was taking her class to sound more like a native Englishman.Mr. Grant was smitten, he later recalled, and he asked if she could give him private lessons. She said yes, at £20 an hour — about $43 in today’s dollars.“But I can only afford £12,” he replied.“All right,” she said, “but you’ll have to repay me if you ever ‘make it.’”The two married in 1986, a year before Mr. Grant made his film debut in “Withnail and I,” which overnight made him one of Britain’s most in-demand actors. He later won acclaim for his performances in movies like “Gosford Park” (2001) and “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” (2018), for which he received an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actor.Ms. Washington learned she had lung cancer late last year, and the disease advanced quickly. She did have one final assignment, though: Mr. Grant had been cast to play Loco Chanelle, a drag queen, in the film version of the stage musical “Everybody’s Talking About Jamie,” and he needed help with his character’s Sheffield accent.A few days after her death, Mr. Grant posted a video on Twitter that Ms. Washington had made of him practicing for the role, with her, offscreen, giving instructions.

She taught Barbra Streisand, Penélope Cruz and countless other performers how to sound like someone else.

Joan Washington, an acclaimed dialect coach who taught Penélope Cruz to sound Greek, Jessica Chastain to sound Israeli and an entire cast of British actors to speak like Brooklyn Jews, died on Sept. 2 at her home in Avening, England. She was 74.

Her husband, the actor Richard E. Grant, announced her death on Twitter. He later said the cause was lung cancer.

In a career spanning four decades, Ms. Washington developed a reputation as a sort of reverse version of Henry Higgins, the elocutionist who taught Eliza Doolittle the King’s English in George Bernard Shaw’s play “Pygmalion.” She instructed actors to speak not just in national dialects but also in regional and local lilts, even historical ones.

She taught actors for most of Britain’s leading national and regional theaters; if a British performer appeared onstage speaking a thick American patois — say, in Neil Simon’s “Brighton Beach Memoirs” — there was a good chance it was Ms. Washington’s handiwork.

She also worked on a steady stream of films. She teamed up with Ms. Cruz for “Captain Corelli’s Mandolin” (2001), Ms. Chastain for “The Debt” (2010), Kate Beckinsale for “Emma” (1996) and the British actress Thandie Newton for “W.,” Oliver Stone’s 2008 take on the life of George W. Bush, in which she played Condoleezza Rice, the former U.S. national security adviser.

Laurie Sparham/Focus Features

Dialect, Ms. Washington said, was not just about mimicry, about reading a script with an accent. It had to be built into the core of a performance.

“A dialect coach must be there from the start,” she told the British newspaper The Independent in 1991. “Otherwise the bad habits are set; it becomes just a bandaging job. There’s enough undoing as it is.”

Ms. Washington was something of a performer herself, though never onstage or onscreen. She could instantly adopt whatever dialect she was teaching, and she claimed to have mastery over 124 vowel sounds — just six shy of what Professor Higgins boasted.

Though she was born and raised in Scotland, Ms. Washington employed a standard English accent when teaching Americans. She said they brought too many assumptions about what “proper” English sounds like and might be confused by her natural Scottish elocution.

“The problem for Americans doing English is that they pronounce their consonants too precisely, which makes it sound rather acquired and middle class,” she said in a 1986 interview with The Sunday Telegraph. “The grander we are, the less we rely on consonants.”

Ms. Washington came about her talent thorough research. Before working with actors, she had taught standard English pronunciation at the Royal College of Nursing, whose students arrived from all over Britain and the Commonwealth. Her recordings of their accents formed the basis of a vast library of tapes she kept as reference.

She interviewed and recorded older Britons to capture what Liverpudlian or Geordie — an accent from Tyneside, in northeast England — might have sounded like decades ago. To show what English sounded like in the 1910s, she relied on recordings of British prisoners made by Germans during World War I.

Her instructional methods were intense. She would often begin by interviewing performers to gauge what they thought a Boston Brahmin or a Warsaw Pole might sound like. She took notes, reams of them, and then handed them to the actors along with copies of her tapes.

Over a series of sessions, she would tweak Rs, adjust inflections and suppress unwanted sibilants until an American actress like Emma Stone sounded like an authentic 18th-century English courtier, as she did in the 2018 film “The Favourite.”

MGM

Ms. Washington always worked freelance, but she was most closely associated with the Royal National Theater, where she worked on more than 70 shows. Her first film was “Yentl” (1983), for which she taught the star and director, Barbra Streisand, how to speak like an Ashkenazi Jew in early-20th-century Poland.

Ms. Washington had her own theories about accents and where they came from. She said that Britain’s plethora of dialects and accents, all crammed onto a medium-size island, derived from its varying geography and climate.

“Cornish is harder and more nasal than Devon because it’s a windy peninsula,” she told The Sunday Telegraph. “If you’ve got the wind in your face, you’ve got to speak without giving much away.”

Joan Geddie was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, on Dec. 21, 1946. Her father, John, was a doctor, and her mother, Maggie (Cook) Geddie, was a nurse.

When she was 18 she moved to London to attend the Central School of Speech and Drama. After graduating, she taught speech, first at a reform school for girls and then at the Royal College of Nursing.

In 1969 she married Keith Washington; they later divorced. Along with Mr. Grant, she is survived by her son, Tom Washington; her daughter, Olivia Grant; and her brother, David Geddie.

While teaching, Ms. Washington also picked up side jobs as a dialect coach. In the class-conscious England of the postwar decades, millions of Britain’s expanding middle class sought to erase any trace of their proletarian origins, starting with their accents, which provided her with an abundance of work.

Her clients included doctors and clergymen as well as actors — the only ones, she said, who went the opposite direction, seeking instruction on how to sound less posh.

She was teaching at the Actors Center in London in 1982 when she met Mr. Grant, who had been born and raised in Swaziland (now Eswatini), in Africa, and was taking her class to sound more like a native Englishman.

Mr. Grant was smitten, he later recalled, and he asked if she could give him private lessons. She said yes, at £20 an hour — about $43 in today’s dollars.

“But I can only afford £12,” he replied.

“All right,” she said, “but you’ll have to repay me if you ever ‘make it.’”

The two married in 1986, a year before Mr. Grant made his film debut in “Withnail and I,” which overnight made him one of Britain’s most in-demand actors. He later won acclaim for his performances in movies like “Gosford Park” (2001) and “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” (2018), for which he received an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actor.

Ms. Washington learned she had lung cancer late last year, and the disease advanced quickly. She did have one final assignment, though: Mr. Grant had been cast to play Loco Chanelle, a drag queen, in the film version of the stage musical “Everybody’s Talking About Jamie,” and he needed help with his character’s Sheffield accent.

A few days after her death, Mr. Grant posted a video on Twitter that Ms. Washington had made of him practicing for the role, with her, offscreen, giving instructions.

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Emmy Predictions 2021: Just How Dominant Will ‘Ted Lasso’ and ‘The Crown’ Be? – Yahoo Singapore News

Even when Emmy voters are for the most part predictable, they always throw in a couple of surprises. Last year, for instance, “Schitt’s Creek” and “Succession” and “Watchmen” won, as expected, but Zendaya scored a shocking victory in the drama actress category for “Euphoria.” And this year, members of the Television Academy voters already pulled some big surprises at the Creative Arts Emmys, most notably when they named “Dolly Parton’s Christmas on the Square” the year’s best television movie and gave Claire Foy the Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series award for one flashback scene in “The Crown.”They’ll no doubt have other surprises up their sleeves on Sunday at the all-vaccinated, all-tested Primetime Emmy Awards. But where? “Ted Lasso” seems like a prohibitive favorite in the comedy categories and “The Crown” the leader in drama, while the nine Emmys already won by “The Queen’s Gambit” may give that show the upper hand in the fiercely competitive Outstanding Limited or Anthology Series category.Here are our best guesses for the 73rd Primetime Emmy Awards — and as confident as we are in many of these picks, we’re even more confident that those darn voters are going to make us look bad a few times.Outstanding Comedy SeriesNominees:“Black-ish”“Cobra Kai“ “Hacks”“Emily in Paris”“The Flight Attendant”“The Kominsky Method”“Pen15” “Ted Lasso“After a year in which many past nominees have either gone off the air (“Schitt’s Creek,” “Fleabag,” “The Good Place”) or didn’t produce new episodes during the eligibility period (“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” “What We Do in the Shadows”), this Emmy season belongs to the new shows. And no new comedy series seized the moment quite like Apple TV+’s “Ted Lasso,” which seems like a prohibitive favorite in this category.Sure, HBO Max’s “Hacks” came on strong late in the Emmy calendar, and the now-airing second season of “Ted Lasso” hasn’t been as unanimously praised as the first one was. But it hardly seems likely that Season 2 will hurt Season 1’s chances to any real degree, because “Ted Lasso” was the series that made us feel good at a time when we really, really needed to feel good. Sometimes, nice guys do finish first.Story continuesPredicted winner: “Ted Lasso”“Ted Lasso” (Apple TV+)Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy SeriesNominees:Anthony Anderson, “Black-ish”Michael Douglas, “The Kominsky Method”William H. Macy, “Shameless”Jason Sudeikis, “Ted Lasso”Kenan Thompson, “Kenan”Anthony Anderson is overdue, Michael Douglas had a fine final season of “The Kominsky Method,” Kenan Thompson also gets a boost from “Saturday Night Live” and William H. Macy has been an Emmy favorite for a very long time. But what that really means is that there will be a competitive battle for second place here. For the last six years in a row, the lead performer in the series that won the outstanding-comedy Emmy has also taken home an acting award, and Ted Lasso himself isn’t about to break that streak.(Although given a recent storyline, it would be fitting if Jason Sudeikis tied with somebody else for this award. But he won’t.)Predicted winner: Jason Sudeikis, “Ted Lasso”Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy SeriesNominees:Aidy Bryant, “Shrill”Kaley Cuoco, “The Flight Attendant”Allison Janney, “Mom“Tracee Ellis Ross, “Black-ish”Jean Smart, “Hacks”Apart from Mr. Lasso, has there been a more indelible and more entertaining lead character in TV comedy this past year than Deborah Vance, the imperious comic diva played by Jean Smart on “Hacks?” No offense to Kaley Cuoco or any of the other nominees, but no, there hasn’t. In a “Lasso”-less year, “Hacks” would probably be the front-runner for Outstanding Comedy Series, and Smart, who’s also nominated for “Mare of Easttown,” should easily pick up her fourth Emmy (after two for “Frasier” and one for “Samantha Who?”) for her delicious performance.Predicted winner: Jean Smart, “Hacks”Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy SeriesNominees:Carl Clemons-Hopkins, “Hacks”Brett Goldstein, “Ted Lasso“Brendan Hunt, “Ted Lasso“Nick Mohammed, “Ted Lasso“Paul Reiser, “The Kominsky Method”Jeremy Swift, “Ted Lasso“ Kenan Thompson, “Saturday Night Live”Bowen Yang, “Saturday Night Live”Now things get interesting, because four of the eight nominees come from the same show — which is, you guessed it, “Ted Lasso.” That’s a lot of potential vote-splitting, unless the “Lasso” vote coalesces around a single actor. But the thing is, it could very well do just that around Brett Goldstein, whose deadpan portrayal of the seething soccer star Roy Kent is one of the show’s true delights.“Saturday Night Live” also has two nominees here, Kenan Thompson and Bowen Yang, and another bit of vote-splitting could well open the door for “The Kominsky Method” star Paul Reiser, who’d be getting his first-ever Emmy (!) on his 12th nomination and his first nod since 1994. But the “SNL” vote will likely focus on Thompson, the longest-running cast member ever, just as the “Ted Lasso” vote focuses on Goldstein. Apart from Alec Baldwin winning in 2017 for playing Donald Trump on “SNL,” this category tends not to go to a sketch comic, which may give the slightest of edges to Goldstein.Predicted winner: Brett Goldstein, “Ted Lasso”“Hacks” (HBO Max)Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy SeriesNominees:Aidy Bryant, “Saturday Night Live”Hannah Einbinder, “Hacks“Kate McKinnon, “Saturday Night Live”Rosie Perez, “The Flight Attendant“Cecily Strong, “Saturday Night Live”Juno Temple, “Ted Lasso” Hannah Waddingham, “Ted Lasso”Hannah’s going to win … but which Hannah? There’s Hannah Einbinder, who essentially has a co-lead role in “Hacks” as a young comic writer who becomes a foil and a punching bag for Jean Smart’s Deborah Vance, and Hannah Waddingham, who is boss, sometime foe and occasional supporter of the misfit coach she hires in “Ted Lasso.”“SNL” has three nominees, of which Cecily Strong might have marginally more momentum than past winner Kate McKinnon, while Rosie Perez might well be the strongest contender not named Hannah for “The Flight Attendant.” And then there’s another “Ted Lasso” star, Juno Temple, whose presence on the ballot might siphon off enough votes from Hannah W. to give the Emmy to Hannah E.Predicted winner: Hannah Einbinder, “Hacks”Outstanding Directing for a Comedy SeriesNominees:James Burrows, “B Positive”: Pilot Susanna Fogel, “The Flight Attendant”: “In Case of Emergency”Lucia Aniello, “Hacks”: “There Is No Line”Jams Widdoes, “Mom”: “Scooby-Doo Checks and Salisbury Steak”Zach Braff, “Ted Lasso”: “Biscuits” M.J. Delaney, “Ted Lasso”: “The Hope That Kills You” Declan Lowney, “Ted Lasso”: “Make Rebecca Great Again”How big a problem is it that “Ted Lasso” has three of the seven nominations? Well, the last eight times that shows have scored multiple nominations in this category – “Barry,” “Atlanta,” “Silicon Valley” twice, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” twice and “Veep” twice – the show with more than one nomination has lost to a series with a single nom. That might not be fatal to “Ted Lasso,” but it is a problem, and an opportunity for “The Flight Attendant” and “Hacks” in particular.Predicted winner: Susanna Fogel, “The Flight Attendant”Outstanding Writing for a Comedy SeriesNominees:Steve Yockey, “The Flight Attendant”: “In Case of Emergency”Meredith Scardino, “Girls5eva”: PilotLucia Aniello, Paul W. Downs, Jen Statsky, “Hacks”: “There Is No Line”Maya Erskine, “PEN15”: “Play”Jason Sudeikis, Brendan Hunt, Joe Kelly, “Ted Lasso”: “Make Rebecca Great Again”Jason Sudeikis, Brendan Hunt, Bill Lawrence, Joe Kelly, “Ted Lasso”: PilotOver the past dozen years, vote-splitting has been as problematic in the writing category as in directing, but last year “Schitt’s Creek” became the first show since “30 Rock” to land multiple nominations but also win. In that case, it was the series finale that took home the prize – so for “Ted Lasso” to turn the trick, it’ll probably have to make sure all its support goes to its pilot. If it can’t do that, “Hacks” – a show that’s a lot about writing – might well be the main beneficiary, though Maya Erskine could be a real wild card for “PEN15.”Predicted winner: “Ted Lasso”: PilotOutstanding Drama SeriesNominees:“The Boys““Bridgerton““The Crown““The Handmaid’s Tale““Lovecraft Country““The Mandalorian““Pose““This Is Us“Could “The Mandalorian” turn into the new “Game of Thrones” — the big, extravagant series that wins all the technical awards and also takes Outstanding Drama Series? The fact that it received 24 nominations, tied for the most among all programs this year, suggests that it has across-the-board support, including in the directing and writing categories. And it got off to a good start at last weekend’s Creative Arts Emmys ceremonies, where its seven awards are tops among all drama series and second only to the limited series “The Queen’s Gambit.”But the other series that received 24 noms this year was “The Crown,” which also has writing and directing nods, along with nine acting nominations to only one for “The Mandalorian.” “The Crown” has been nominated for every one of its four seasons and it’s never won, but with the two shows that beat it (“Game of Thrones” and “Succession”) out of the running this year, it looks like the clear favorite over “The Mandalorian.”There is one dark-horse candidate to watch out for, though: The final season of “Pose,” a groundbreaking show for transgender representation on television, was a richly satisfying one and has a chance to pull off a real upset.Predicted winner: “The Crown”Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama SeriesNominees:Sterling K. Brown, “This Is Us”Jonathan Majors, “Lovecraft Country”Josh O’Conner, “The Crown”Regé-Jean Page, “Bridgerton”Billy Porter, “Pose”Matthew Rhys, “Perry Mason”Three of the last four winners in this category are nominated this year: Billy Porter from “Pose,” who won in 2019; Matthew Rhys from “Perry Mason,” who won in 2018 for “The Americans”; and Sterling K. Brown from “This Is Us,” who won in 2017. Of those three, Porter has the best shot to win again for his show’s final season, though Jonathan Majors from “Lovecraft Country” and Regé-Jean Page from “Bridgerton” are solid contenders as well. The frontrunner, though, is Josh O’Connor, whose performance as Prince Charles in “The Crown” has already won him Golden Globe and Critics Choice awards.Predicted winner: Josh O’Connor, “The Crown”Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama SeriesNominees:Uzo Aduba, “In Treatment”Olivia Colman, “The Crown”Emma Corrin, “The Crown”Elisabeth Moss, “The Handmaid’s Tale”Mj Rodriguez, “Pose”Jurnee Smollett, “Lovecraft Country”It’s rare for a show to place a pair of actresses in this category, but Olivia Colman and Emma Corrin have been consistently nominated by every awards group for playing Queen Elizabeth and Princess Diana in Season 4 of “The Crown.” Typically, Corrin has been the one who goes home with the award, and she’s certainly the odds-on favorite here. But Mj Rodriguez, the first transgender actress ever nominated in this category, definitely has a chance to make further history, while you can’t overlook past winner Elisabeth Moss. And you can never overlook Uzo Aduba at the Emmys, where she’s won three times in four nominations and where she’s in the running as the star of the late-breaking HBO series “In Treatment.” But as the festival favorite movie “Spencer” shows, Princess Di is a very hot property these days.Predicted winner: Emma Corrin, “The Crown”Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama SeriesNominees:Giancarlo Esposito, “The Mandalorian”O-T Fagbenle, “The Handmaid’s Tale”John Lithgow, “Perry Mason”Tobias Menzies, “The Crown”Max Minghella, “The Handmaid’s Tale”Chris Sullivan, “This Is Us” Bradley Whitford, “The Handmaid’s Tale”Michael K. Williams, “Lovecraft Country”If the late Michael K. Williams wins for “Lovecraft Country,” it will not have been a sentimental choice: Voting ended before his death on Sept. 6. But with O-T Fagbenle, Max Minghella and Bradley Whitford potentially splitting the “Handmaid’s Tale” vote and “The Crown” likely winning acting awards in too many other categories, Williams is liable to edge out Tobias Menzies and Giancarlo Esposito for what will be a sentimental presentation.Predicted winner: Michael K. Williams, “Lovecraft Country”Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama SeriesNominees:Gillian Anderson, “The Crown“Helena Bonham Carter, “The Crown”Madeline Brewer, “The Handmaid’s Tale”Ann Dowd, “The Handmaid’s Tale”Aunjanue Ellis, “Lovecraft Country”Emerald Fennell, “The Crown”Yvonne Strahovski, “The Handmaid’s Tale”Samira Wiley, “The Handmaid’s Tale”Gillian Anderson has already won SAG and Golden Globe awards for playing Margaret Thatcher in “The Crown,” and the only thing that might prevent her from adding an Emmy is that two of her co-stars, Helena Bonham Carter and Emerald Fennell, are also nominated and could conceivably split the vote. But that vote has all gone to Anderson so far, and her competition includes not three but four nominees from “The Handmaid’s Tale,” of which Yvonne Strahovski and Ann Dowd probably have the best shot.Unless all those “Crown” and “Handmaid” votes split and Aunjanue Ellis sneaks in for “Lovecraft Country,” this is probably another prize for Anderson.Predicted winner: Gillian Anderson, “The Crown”Outstanding Directing for a Drama SeriesNominees:Julie Anne Robinson, “Bridgerton”: “Diamond of the First Water”Benjamin Caron, “The Crown”: “Fairytale”Jessica Hobbs, “The Crown”: “War” Liz Garbus, “The Handmaid’s Tale”: “The Wilderness” Jon Favreau, “The Mandalorian”: “Chapter 9: The Marshal”Steven Canals, “Pose”: Series FinaleUnlike in the comedy-directing category, multiple directing nominations don’t seem to hurt dramas: Of the last eight shows that have received two or three noms in a single year, five have won the Emmy with one of their episodes. This year, “The Crown” has two nominations, and votes are likely to gravitate toward the Diana-focused episode, “Fairytale.” But this could also be a spot to recognize the scale of “The Mandalorian,” or to give “The Handmaid’s Tale” a significant award, or to honor the final episode of “Pose.” In four of the last six years this category has gone to the Outstanding Drama Series winner, so we’ll go with “The Crown.”Predicted winner: “The Crown”: “Fairytale”Outstanding Writing for a Drama SeriesNominees:Rebecca Sonnenshine, “The Boys”: “What I Know”Peter Morgan, “The Crown”: “War”Yahlin Chang, “The Handmaid’s Tale”: “Home”Misha Green, “Lovecraft Country”: “Sundown”Dave Filoni, “The Mandalorian”: “Chapter 13: The Jedi” Jon Favreau, “The Mandalorian”: “Chapter 16: The Rescue”Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk, Steven Canals, Janet Mock, Our Lady J, “Pose”: Series FinaleIn this category, “The Mandalorian” is the show with multiple nominations – but with the exception of awards for “Game of Thrones” in 2015 and ’16, the award typically goes to talkier, less high-octane shows. That could mean “The Handmaid’s Tale” or “Lovecraft Country” or “Pose,” or most likely the season finale of “The Crown.”Predicted winner: “The Crown”: “War”PHIL BRAY/NETFLIXOutstanding Limited or Anthology SeriesNominees:“I May Destroy You““Mare of Easttown“ “The Queen’s Gambit““The Underground Railroad““WandaVision“When it premiered last fall, “The Queen’s Gambit” seemed liable to breeze to a win in this category – but since then, “WandaVision” became Marvel’s breakout TV entry, “Mare of Easttown” turned into appointment TV, “I May Destroy You” picked up strong buzz and Barry Jenkins released the formidable “The Underground Railroad.” So now it’s a much closer race – but the fact that “Queen’s Gambit” has already won nine Creative Arts Emmys, the most of any program, suggests that it’s still the favorite.Predicted winner: “The Queen’s Gambit”Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited or Anthology Series or MovieNominees:Paul Bettany, “WandaVision”Hugh Grant, “The Undoing”Ewan McGregor, “Halston”Lin-Manuel Miranda, “Hamilton”Leslie Odom Jr., “Hamilton”You can make a case any one of these nominees winning — Miranda because of the cultural impact of the show he created, “Hamilton”; Odom because his performance as Aaron Burr in that show was so strong that it beat Miranda for the Tony Award; McGregor because of the scope of his performance as Halston; Grant because he keeps doing great work on TV; Bettany because “WandaVision” gives him to chance to play a Marvel superhero but also to pay tribute to classic TV icons. And maybe because what Bettany does is so much fun and so unexpected, he might have a slight edge.Predicted winner: Paul Bettany, “WandaVision”Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited or Anthology Series or MovieNominees:Michaela Coel, “I May Destroy You”Cynthia Erivo, “Genius: Aretha”Elizabeth Olsen, “WandaVision”Anya Taylor-Joy, “The Queen’s Gambit”Kate Winslet, “Mare of Easttown”Back when “The Queen’s Gambit” was dominating pop culture and people were buying chess sets, Anya Taylor-Joy felt like a sure winner at the Emmys to follow her wins at SAG and the Globes and the Critics Choice Awards. But then Kate Winslet and “Mare of Easttown” happened, and suddenly a runaway turned into a very close race. “The Queen’s Gambit” may still win the most awards, but it’s hard to deny Kate Winslet and her Delco accent.Predicted winner: Kate Winslet, “Mare of Easttown”Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited or Anthology Series or MovieNominees:Thomas Brodie Sangster, “The Queen’s Gambit“ Daveed Diggs, “Hamilton” Paapa Essiedu, “I May Destroy You“Jonathan Groff, “Hamilton”Evan Peters, “Mare of Easttown”Anthony Ramos, “Hamilton”Half of the category is from “Hamilton,” but will voters go for a piece of recorded theater over the limited series that make up the rest of the nominees? (If so, it’ll likely be Daveed Diggs over Jonathan Groff and Anthony Ramos.) Thomas Brodie Sangster will get attention for proving that the lovestruck little kid from “Love, Actually” grew up, and Paapa Essiedu would be a high-profile win for “I May Destroy You” – but as Winslet’s sparring partner in “Mare of Easttown,” Evan Peters played a crucial part in that series.Predicted winner: Evan Peters, “Mare of Easttown”Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited or Anthology Series or MovieNominees:Renée Elise Goldsberry, “Hamilton”Kathryn Hahn, “WandaVision”Moses Ingram, “The Queen’s Gambit“Julianne Nicholson, “Mare of Easttown” Jean Smart, “Mare of Easttown”Phillipa Soo, “Hamilton”Along with two more “Hamilton” nominees, Renee Elise Goldsberry and Phillipa Soo, the category contains two from “Mare of Easttown,” Jean Smart and Julianne Nicholson. Nicholson could win on the strength of the show’s wrenching final episode, but Kathryn Hahn is so irresistible as neighborhood witch Agatha Harkness that she may have the upper hand.Predicted winner: Kathryn Hahn, “WandaVision”Outstanding Directing for A Limited or Anthology Series or MovieNominees:Thomas Kail, “Hamilton” Sam Miller, Michaela Coel, “I May Destroy You”: “Ego Death”Sam Miller, “I May Destroy You”: “Eyes Eyes Eyes Eyes”Craig Zobel, “Mare of Easttown”Scott Frank, “The Queen’s Gambit” Barry Jenkins, “The Underground Railroad”Matt Shakman, “WandaVision”Four of the nominations are for full limited series, ranging in length from five-and-a-half to 10 hours; one is for the movie-length version of “Hamilton”; and two are for individual episodes of “I May Destroy You.” In the past decade, single episode directors have won three times, but only once in the last six years, which probably tilts the scales toward the large-scale achievement of “The Queen’s Gambit,” “The Underground Railroad,” “WandaVision” or “Mare of Easttown.” While the playfulness and variety of “WandaVision” will likely get votes, this may come down to Barry Jenkins for “The Underground Railroad” and Scott Frank for “The Queen’s Gambit” – and the latter show seems to be a favorite of voters, judging by the Creative Arts results.Predicted winner: Scott Frank, “The Queen’s Gambit”Outstanding Writing for A Limited or Anthology Series or MovieNominees:Michaela Coel, “I May Destroy You”Brad Inglesby, “Mare of Easttown”Scott Frank, “The Queen’s Gambit”Jan Shaeffer, “WandaVision”: “Filmed Before a Live Studio Audience”Chuck Hayward, Peter Cameron, “WandaVision”: “All-New Halloween Spooktacular”Laura Donney, “WandaVision”: Previously On”Like the directing category, the nominees are a mixture of single-episode writers (the three from “WandaVision”) and writers of an entire limited series. The scale of “The Queen’s Gambit” and the twists and turns in “Mare of Easttown” make them strong competitors, but this category also feels like the best way to reward Michaela Coel for her deeply personal critical favorite “I May Destroy You,” so she may eke out a close win over “Mare.”Predicted winner: Michaela Coel, “I May Destroy You”Outstanding Variety Talk SeriesNominees:“Conan”“The Daily Show With Trevor Noah”“Jimmy Kimmel Live!”“Last Week Tonight With John Oliver”“The Late Show With Stephen Colbert”In a category that loves streaks, John Oliver has won for the last five years in a row, this despite the fact that his show is pretty much a talk show only in the sense that he talks to viewers. There’s not much reason to think that Oliver’s streak will end, except for that sudden outpouring of love for Conan O’Brien when his show ended right after nominations were announced in July. Jon Stewart got a sentimental parting gift when his “Daily Show” ended in 2015, winning one last Emmy even though Stephen Colbert had won in the two previous years – so while it’s unlikely, it’s not out of the question that “Conan” could get his own golden sendoff.Predicted winner: “Last Week Tonight With John Oliver”Outstanding Variety Sketch SeriesNominees:“A Black Lady Sketch Show”“Saturday Night Live”Television Academy rules say this category should no longer exist, because there simply aren’t enough sketch shows to make a competitive field. But there was such an outcry when the Academy announced plans to merge this category with the talk-series category that they changed their minds. With a paltry nine shows qualifying for consideration, the rules limited the category to two nominees, one of which is the winningest show in Emmy history, “Saturday Night Live.” “SNL” might lose eventually (most likely when the Academy succeeds in merging this category), but it’s won four consecutive years, and its nine victories at the Creative Arts Emmys last weekend suggest that it’ll make it five in a row.Predicted winner: “Saturday Night Live”Disney+Outstanding Variety Special (Pre-Recorded)Nominees:“Bo Burnham: Inside”“David Byrne’s American Utopia”“8:46 – Dave Chappelle”“Friends: The Reunion”“Hamilton”“A West Wing Special to Benefit When We All Vote”This is a beast of a category, with nominees that include the film version of “Hamilton,” with its seven acting nominations; “Bo Burnham: Inside,” a critically adored one-man show that has already won Burnham awards for writing, directing and music direction; “David Byrne’s American Utopia,” directed by no less than Spike Lee; and “8:46 – Dave Chappelle,” the latest comedy special from the man who has won two of the last three awards in this category.At one point, “Hamilton” seemed like the clear frontrunner here – but “Inside,” which dropped the day before the end of Emmy eligibility, came on very strong at exactly the right moment. The race is probably neck-and-neck between the two, one traditional and the other weirder and more adventurous. (How strange is it that a multiracial hip-hop musical about the founding fathers can be seen as the conservative choice?) Depending on how the age of voters in the category skews, this could go either direction.Predicted winner: “Hamilton”Outstanding Writing for A Variety SeriesNominees:“The Amber Ruffin Show” “A Black Lady Sketch Show”“Last Week Tonight With John Oliver”“Late Show With Stephen Colbert”“Saturday Night Live”When “Last Week Tonight With John Oliver” wins Outstanding Variety Talk Series, it also wins this category. In fact, no show has ever won Outstanding Variety Talk Series without also winning this category, which means that Oliver is pretty much a lock here. Plus, the one show that has a chance to knock him off in the talk-series category, “Conan,” isn’t nominated here – so even if Oliver loses that category, he won’t lose this one.Predicted winner: “Last Week Tonight With John Oliver”Outstanding Competition ProgramNominees:“The Amazing Race”“Nailed It!” “RuPaul’s Drag Race”“Top Chef” “The Voice”Competition program is another category where voters love streaks: “The Amazing Race” won for seven years in a row, “The Voice” won for three, and now “RuPaul’s Drag Race” is on a roll with three straight wins. And considering that it won five awards at the Creative Arts Emmys while none of its fellow nominees won any, it’d be a shock if it doesn’t extend its streak to six, even up against the category’s all-time winner, “The Amazing Race,” and the up-and-coming “Nailed It!”Predicted winner: “RuPaul’s Drag Race”

Even when Emmy voters are for the most part predictable, they always throw in a couple of surprises. Last year, for instance, “Schitt’s Creek” and “Succession” and “Watchmen” won, as expected, but Zendaya scored a shocking victory in the drama actress category for “Euphoria.” And this year, members of the Television Academy voters already pulled some big surprises at the Creative Arts Emmys, most notably when they named “Dolly Parton’s Christmas on the Square” the year’s best television movie and gave Claire Foy the Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series award for one flashback scene in “The Crown.”

They’ll no doubt have other surprises up their sleeves on Sunday at the all-vaccinated, all-tested Primetime Emmy Awards. But where? “Ted Lasso” seems like a prohibitive favorite in the comedy categories and “The Crown” the leader in drama, while the nine Emmys already won by “The Queen’s Gambit” may give that show the upper hand in the fiercely competitive Outstanding Limited or Anthology Series category.

Here are our best guesses for the 73rd Primetime Emmy Awards — and as confident as we are in many of these picks, we’re even more confident that those darn voters are going to make us look bad a few times.

Outstanding Comedy Series

Nominees:
Black-ish
Cobra Kai
Hacks
Emily in Paris
The Flight Attendant
The Kominsky Method
Pen15
Ted Lasso

After a year in which many past nominees have either gone off the air (“Schitt’s Creek,” “Fleabag,” “The Good Place”) or didn’t produce new episodes during the eligibility period (“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” “What We Do in the Shadows”), this Emmy season belongs to the new shows. And no new comedy series seized the moment quite like Apple TV+’s “Ted Lasso,” which seems like a prohibitive favorite in this category.

Sure, HBO Max’s “Hacks” came on strong late in the Emmy calendar, and the now-airing second season of “Ted Lasso” hasn’t been as unanimously praised as the first one was. But it hardly seems likely that Season 2 will hurt Season 1’s chances to any real degree, because “Ted Lasso” was the series that made us feel good at a time when we really, really needed to feel good. Sometimes, nice guys do finish first.

Predicted winner: “Ted Lasso”

“Ted Lasso” (Apple TV+)“Ted Lasso” (Apple TV+)

“Ted Lasso” (Apple TV+)

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series

Nominees:
Anthony Anderson, “Black-ish”
Michael Douglas, “The Kominsky Method”
William H. Macy, “Shameless”
Jason Sudeikis, “Ted Lasso”
Kenan Thompson, “Kenan

Anthony Anderson is overdue, Michael Douglas had a fine final season of “The Kominsky Method,” Kenan Thompson also gets a boost from “Saturday Night Live” and William H. Macy has been an Emmy favorite for a very long time. But what that really means is that there will be a competitive battle for second place here. For the last six years in a row, the lead performer in the series that won the outstanding-comedy Emmy has also taken home an acting award, and Ted Lasso himself isn’t about to break that streak.

(Although given a recent storyline, it would be fitting if Jason Sudeikis tied with somebody else for this award. But he won’t.)

Predicted winner: Jason Sudeikis, “Ted Lasso”

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series

Nominees:
Aidy Bryant, “Shrill”
Kaley Cuoco, “The Flight Attendant”
Allison Janney, “Mom
Tracee Ellis Ross, “Black-ish”
Jean Smart, “Hacks”

Apart from Mr. Lasso, has there been a more indelible and more entertaining lead character in TV comedy this past year than Deborah Vance, the imperious comic diva played by Jean Smart on “Hacks?” No offense to Kaley Cuoco or any of the other nominees, but no, there hasn’t. In a “Lasso”-less year, “Hacks” would probably be the front-runner for Outstanding Comedy Series, and Smart, who’s also nominated for “Mare of Easttown,” should easily pick up her fourth Emmy (after two for “Frasier” and one for “Samantha Who?”) for her delicious performance.

Predicted winner: Jean Smart, “Hacks”

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

Nominees:
Carl Clemons-Hopkins, “Hacks”
Brett Goldstein, “Ted Lasso
Brendan Hunt, “Ted Lasso
Nick Mohammed, “Ted Lasso
Paul Reiser, “The Kominsky Method”
Jeremy Swift, “Ted Lasso
Kenan Thompson, “Saturday Night Live”
Bowen Yang, “Saturday Night Live”

Now things get interesting, because four of the eight nominees come from the same show — which is, you guessed it, “Ted Lasso.” That’s a lot of potential vote-splitting, unless the “Lasso” vote coalesces around a single actor. But the thing is, it could very well do just that around Brett Goldstein, whose deadpan portrayal of the seething soccer star Roy Kent is one of the show’s true delights.

“Saturday Night Live” also has two nominees here, Kenan Thompson and Bowen Yang, and another bit of vote-splitting could well open the door for “The Kominsky Method” star Paul Reiser, who’d be getting his first-ever Emmy (!) on his 12th nomination and his first nod since 1994. But the “SNL” vote will likely focus on Thompson, the longest-running cast member ever, just as the “Ted Lasso” vote focuses on Goldstein. Apart from Alec Baldwin winning in 2017 for playing Donald Trump on “SNL,” this category tends not to go to a sketch comic, which may give the slightest of edges to Goldstein.

Predicted winner: Brett Goldstein, “Ted Lasso”

“Hacks” (HBO Max)“Hacks” (HBO Max)

“Hacks” (HBO Max)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

Nominees:
Aidy Bryant, “Saturday Night Live”
Hannah Einbinder, “Hacks
Kate McKinnon, “Saturday Night Live”
Rosie Perez, “The Flight Attendant
Cecily Strong, “Saturday Night Live”
Juno Temple, “Ted Lasso”
Hannah Waddingham, “Ted Lasso”

Hannah’s going to win … but which Hannah? There’s Hannah Einbinder, who essentially has a co-lead role in “Hacks” as a young comic writer who becomes a foil and a punching bag for Jean Smart’s Deborah Vance, and Hannah Waddingham, who is boss, sometime foe and occasional supporter of the misfit coach she hires in “Ted Lasso.”

“SNL” has three nominees, of which Cecily Strong might have marginally more momentum than past winner Kate McKinnon, while Rosie Perez might well be the strongest contender not named Hannah for “The Flight Attendant.” And then there’s another “Ted Lasso” star, Juno Temple, whose presence on the ballot might siphon off enough votes from Hannah W. to give the Emmy to Hannah E.

Predicted winner: Hannah Einbinder, “Hacks”

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series

Nominees:
James Burrows, “B Positive”: Pilot
Susanna Fogel, “The Flight Attendant”: “In Case of Emergency”
Lucia Aniello, “Hacks”: “There Is No Line”
Jams Widdoes, “Mom”: “Scooby-Doo Checks and Salisbury Steak”
Zach Braff, “Ted Lasso”: “Biscuits”
M.J. Delaney, “Ted Lasso”: “The Hope That Kills You”
Declan Lowney, “Ted Lasso”: “Make Rebecca Great Again”

How big a problem is it that “Ted Lasso” has three of the seven nominations? Well, the last eight times that shows have scored multiple nominations in this category – “Barry,” “Atlanta,” “Silicon Valley” twice, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” twice and “Veep” twice – the show with more than one nomination has lost to a series with a single nom. That might not be fatal to “Ted Lasso,” but it is a problem, and an opportunity for “The Flight Attendant” and “Hacks” in particular.

Predicted winner: Susanna Fogel, “The Flight Attendant”

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series

Nominees:
Steve Yockey, “The Flight Attendant”: “In Case of Emergency”
Meredith Scardino, “Girls5eva”: Pilot
Lucia Aniello, Paul W. Downs, Jen Statsky, “Hacks”: “There Is No Line”
Maya Erskine, “PEN15”: “Play”
Jason Sudeikis, Brendan Hunt, Joe Kelly, “Ted Lasso”: “Make Rebecca Great Again”
Jason Sudeikis, Brendan Hunt, Bill Lawrence, Joe Kelly, “Ted Lasso”: Pilot

Over the past dozen years, vote-splitting has been as problematic in the writing category as in directing, but last year “Schitt’s Creek” became the first show since “30 Rock” to land multiple nominations but also win. In that case, it was the series finale that took home the prize – so for “Ted Lasso” to turn the trick, it’ll probably have to make sure all its support goes to its pilot. If it can’t do that, “Hacks” – a show that’s a lot about writing – might well be the main beneficiary, though Maya Erskine could be a real wild card for “PEN15.”

Predicted winner: “Ted Lasso”: Pilot

Outstanding Drama Series

Nominees:
The Boys
Bridgerton
The Crown
The Handmaid’s Tale
Lovecraft Country
The Mandalorian
Pose
This Is Us

Could “The Mandalorian” turn into the new “Game of Thrones” — the big, extravagant series that wins all the technical awards and also takes Outstanding Drama Series? The fact that it received 24 nominations, tied for the most among all programs this year, suggests that it has across-the-board support, including in the directing and writing categories. And it got off to a good start at last weekend’s Creative Arts Emmys ceremonies, where its seven awards are tops among all drama series and second only to the limited series “The Queen’s Gambit.”

But the other series that received 24 noms this year was “The Crown,” which also has writing and directing nods, along with nine acting nominations to only one for “The Mandalorian.” “The Crown” has been nominated for every one of its four seasons and it’s never won, but with the two shows that beat it (“Game of Thrones” and “Succession”) out of the running this year, it looks like the clear favorite over “The Mandalorian.”

There is one dark-horse candidate to watch out for, though: The final season of “Pose,” a groundbreaking show for transgender representation on television, was a richly satisfying one and has a chance to pull off a real upset.

Predicted winner: “The Crown”

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series

Nominees:
Sterling K. Brown, “This Is Us”
Jonathan Majors, “Lovecraft Country”
Josh O’Conner, “The Crown
Regé-Jean Page, “Bridgerton”
Billy Porter, “Pose”
Matthew Rhys, “Perry Mason”

Three of the last four winners in this category are nominated this year: Billy Porter from “Pose,” who won in 2019; Matthew Rhys from “Perry Mason,” who won in 2018 for “The Americans”; and Sterling K. Brown from “This Is Us,” who won in 2017. Of those three, Porter has the best shot to win again for his show’s final season, though Jonathan Majors from “Lovecraft Country” and Regé-Jean Page from “Bridgerton” are solid contenders as well. The frontrunner, though, is Josh O’Connor, whose performance as Prince Charles in “The Crown” has already won him Golden Globe and Critics Choice awards.

Predicted winner: Josh O’Connor, “The Crown”

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series

Nominees:
Uzo Aduba, “In Treatment”
Olivia Colman, “The Crown”
Emma Corrin, “The Crown”
Elisabeth Moss, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Mj Rodriguez, “Pose”
Jurnee Smollett, “Lovecraft Country”

It’s rare for a show to place a pair of actresses in this category, but Olivia Colman and Emma Corrin have been consistently nominated by every awards group for playing Queen Elizabeth and Princess Diana in Season 4 of “The Crown.” Typically, Corrin has been the one who goes home with the award, and she’s certainly the odds-on favorite here. But Mj Rodriguez, the first transgender actress ever nominated in this category, definitely has a chance to make further history, while you can’t overlook past winner Elisabeth Moss. And you can never overlook Uzo Aduba at the Emmys, where she’s won three times in four nominations and where she’s in the running as the star of the late-breaking HBO series “In Treatment.” But as the festival favorite movie “Spencer” shows, Princess Di is a very hot property these days.

Predicted winner: Emma Corrin, “The Crown”

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series

Nominees:
Giancarlo Esposito, “The Mandalorian”
O-T Fagbenle, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
John Lithgow, “Perry Mason”
Tobias Menzies, “The Crown”
Max Minghella, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Chris Sullivan, “This Is Us”
Bradley Whitford, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Michael K. Williams, “Lovecraft Country”

If the late Michael K. Williams wins for “Lovecraft Country,” it will not have been a sentimental choice: Voting ended before his death on Sept. 6. But with O-T Fagbenle, Max Minghella and Bradley Whitford potentially splitting the “Handmaid’s Tale” vote and “The Crown” likely winning acting awards in too many other categories, Williams is liable to edge out Tobias Menzies and Giancarlo Esposito for what will be a sentimental presentation.

Predicted winner: Michael K. Williams, “Lovecraft Country”

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

Nominees:
Gillian Anderson, “The Crown
Helena Bonham Carter, “The Crown”
Madeline Brewer, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Ann Dowd, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Aunjanue Ellis, “Lovecraft Country”
Emerald Fennell, “The Crown”
Yvonne Strahovski, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Samira Wiley, “The Handmaid’s Tale”

Gillian Anderson has already won SAG and Golden Globe awards for playing Margaret Thatcher in “The Crown,” and the only thing that might prevent her from adding an Emmy is that two of her co-stars, Helena Bonham Carter and Emerald Fennell, are also nominated and could conceivably split the vote. But that vote has all gone to Anderson so far, and her competition includes not three but four nominees from “The Handmaid’s Tale,” of which Yvonne Strahovski and Ann Dowd probably have the best shot.

Unless all those “Crown” and “Handmaid” votes split and Aunjanue Ellis sneaks in for “Lovecraft Country,” this is probably another prize for Anderson.

Predicted winner: Gillian Anderson, “The Crown”

Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series

Nominees:
Julie Anne Robinson, “Bridgerton”: “Diamond of the First Water”
Benjamin Caron, “The Crown”: “Fairytale”
Jessica Hobbs, “The Crown”: “War”
Liz Garbus, “The Handmaid’s Tale”: “The Wilderness”
Jon Favreau, “The Mandalorian”: “Chapter 9: The Marshal”
Steven Canals, “Pose”: Series Finale

Unlike in the comedy-directing category, multiple directing nominations don’t seem to hurt dramas: Of the last eight shows that have received two or three noms in a single year, five have won the Emmy with one of their episodes. This year, “The Crown” has two nominations, and votes are likely to gravitate toward the Diana-focused episode, “Fairytale.” But this could also be a spot to recognize the scale of “The Mandalorian,” or to give “The Handmaid’s Tale” a significant award, or to honor the final episode of “Pose.” In four of the last six years this category has gone to the Outstanding Drama Series winner, so we’ll go with “The Crown.”

Predicted winner: “The Crown”: “Fairytale”

Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series

Nominees:
Rebecca Sonnenshine, “The Boys”: “What I Know”
Peter Morgan, “The Crown”: “War”
Yahlin Chang, “The Handmaid’s Tale”: “Home”
Misha Green, “Lovecraft Country”: “Sundown”
Dave Filoni, “The Mandalorian”: “Chapter 13: The Jedi”
Jon Favreau, “The Mandalorian”: “Chapter 16: The Rescue”
Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk, Steven Canals, Janet Mock, Our Lady J, “Pose”: Series Finale

In this category, “The Mandalorian” is the show with multiple nominations – but with the exception of awards for “Game of Thrones” in 2015 and ’16, the award typically goes to talkier, less high-octane shows. That could mean “The Handmaid’s Tale” or “Lovecraft Country” or “Pose,” or most likely the season finale of “The Crown.”

Predicted winner: “The Crown”: “War”

Anya Taylor-Joy in "The Queen's Gambit"Anya Taylor-Joy in "The Queen's Gambit"

PHIL BRAY/NETFLIX

Outstanding Limited or Anthology Series

Nominees:
I May Destroy You
Mare of Easttown
The Queen’s Gambit
The Underground Railroad
WandaVision

When it premiered last fall, “The Queen’s Gambit” seemed liable to breeze to a win in this category – but since then, “WandaVision” became Marvel’s breakout TV entry, “Mare of Easttown” turned into appointment TV, “I May Destroy You” picked up strong buzz and Barry Jenkins released the formidable “The Underground Railroad.” So now it’s a much closer race – but the fact that “Queen’s Gambit” has already won nine Creative Arts Emmys, the most of any program, suggests that it’s still the favorite.

Predicted winner: “The Queen’s Gambit”

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited or Anthology Series or Movie

Nominees:
Paul Bettany, “WandaVision”
Hugh Grant, “The Undoing”
Ewan McGregor, “Halston”
Lin-Manuel Miranda, “Hamilton”
Leslie Odom Jr., “Hamilton”

You can make a case any one of these nominees winning — Miranda because of the cultural impact of the show he created, “Hamilton”; Odom because his performance as Aaron Burr in that show was so strong that it beat Miranda for the Tony Award; McGregor because of the scope of his performance as Halston; Grant because he keeps doing great work on TV; Bettany because “WandaVision” gives him to chance to play a Marvel superhero but also to pay tribute to classic TV icons. And maybe because what Bettany does is so much fun and so unexpected, he might have a slight edge.

Predicted winner: Paul Bettany, “WandaVision”

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited or Anthology Series or Movie

Nominees:
Michaela Coel, “I May Destroy You”
Cynthia Erivo, “Genius: Aretha”
Elizabeth Olsen, “WandaVision”
Anya Taylor-Joy, “The Queen’s Gambit”
Kate Winslet, “Mare of Easttown”

Back when “The Queen’s Gambit” was dominating pop culture and people were buying chess sets, Anya Taylor-Joy felt like a sure winner at the Emmys to follow her wins at SAG and the Globes and the Critics Choice Awards. But then Kate Winslet and “Mare of Easttown” happened, and suddenly a runaway turned into a very close race. “The Queen’s Gambit” may still win the most awards, but it’s hard to deny Kate Winslet and her Delco accent.

Predicted winner: Kate Winslet, “Mare of Easttown”

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited or Anthology Series or Movie

Nominees:
Thomas Brodie Sangster, “The Queen’s Gambit
Daveed Diggs, “Hamilton”
Paapa Essiedu, “I May Destroy You
Jonathan Groff, “Hamilton”
Evan Peters, “Mare of Easttown”
Anthony Ramos, “Hamilton”

Half of the category is from “Hamilton,” but will voters go for a piece of recorded theater over the limited series that make up the rest of the nominees? (If so, it’ll likely be Daveed Diggs over Jonathan Groff and Anthony Ramos.) Thomas Brodie Sangster will get attention for proving that the lovestruck little kid from “Love, Actually” grew up, and Paapa Essiedu would be a high-profile win for “I May Destroy You” – but as Winslet’s sparring partner in “Mare of Easttown,” Evan Peters played a crucial part in that series.

Predicted winner: Evan Peters, “Mare of Easttown”

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited or Anthology Series or Movie

Nominees:
Renée Elise Goldsberry, “Hamilton”
Kathryn Hahn, “WandaVision”
Moses Ingram, “The Queen’s Gambit
Julianne Nicholson, “Mare of Easttown”
Jean Smart, “Mare of Easttown”
Phillipa Soo, “Hamilton”

Along with two more “Hamilton” nominees, Renee Elise Goldsberry and Phillipa Soo, the category contains two from “Mare of Easttown,” Jean Smart and Julianne Nicholson. Nicholson could win on the strength of the show’s wrenching final episode, but Kathryn Hahn is so irresistible as neighborhood witch Agatha Harkness that she may have the upper hand.

Predicted winner: Kathryn Hahn, “WandaVision”

Outstanding Directing for A Limited or Anthology Series or Movie

Nominees:
Thomas Kail, “Hamilton”
Sam Miller, Michaela Coel, “I May Destroy You”: “Ego Death”
Sam Miller, “I May Destroy You”: “Eyes Eyes Eyes Eyes”
Craig Zobel, “Mare of Easttown”
Scott Frank, “The Queen’s Gambit”
Barry Jenkins, “The Underground Railroad”
Matt Shakman, “WandaVision”

Four of the nominations are for full limited series, ranging in length from five-and-a-half to 10 hours; one is for the movie-length version of “Hamilton”; and two are for individual episodes of “I May Destroy You.” In the past decade, single episode directors have won three times, but only once in the last six years, which probably tilts the scales toward the large-scale achievement of “The Queen’s Gambit,” “The Underground Railroad,” “WandaVision” or “Mare of Easttown.” While the playfulness and variety of “WandaVision” will likely get votes, this may come down to Barry Jenkins for “The Underground Railroad” and Scott Frank for “The Queen’s Gambit” – and the latter show seems to be a favorite of voters, judging by the Creative Arts results.

Predicted winner: Scott Frank, “The Queen’s Gambit”

Outstanding Writing for A Limited or Anthology Series or Movie

Nominees:
Michaela Coel, “I May Destroy You”
Brad Inglesby, “Mare of Easttown”
Scott Frank, “The Queen’s Gambit”
Jan Shaeffer, “WandaVision”: “Filmed Before a Live Studio Audience”
Chuck Hayward, Peter Cameron, “WandaVision”: “All-New Halloween Spooktacular”
Laura Donney, “WandaVision”: Previously On”

Like the directing category, the nominees are a mixture of single-episode writers (the three from “WandaVision”) and writers of an entire limited series. The scale of “The Queen’s Gambit” and the twists and turns in “Mare of Easttown” make them strong competitors, but this category also feels like the best way to reward Michaela Coel for her deeply personal critical favorite “I May Destroy You,” so she may eke out a close win over “Mare.”

Predicted winner: Michaela Coel, “I May Destroy You”

Outstanding Variety Talk Series

Nominees:
“Conan”
“The Daily Show With Trevor Noah”
“Jimmy Kimmel Live!”
“Last Week Tonight With John Oliver”
“The Late Show With Stephen Colbert”

In a category that loves streaks, John Oliver has won for the last five years in a row, this despite the fact that his show is pretty much a talk show only in the sense that he talks to viewers. There’s not much reason to think that Oliver’s streak will end, except for that sudden outpouring of love for Conan O’Brien when his show ended right after nominations were announced in July. Jon Stewart got a sentimental parting gift when his “Daily Show” ended in 2015, winning one last Emmy even though Stephen Colbert had won in the two previous years – so while it’s unlikely, it’s not out of the question that “Conan” could get his own golden sendoff.

Predicted winner: “Last Week Tonight With John Oliver”

Outstanding Variety Sketch Series

Nominees:
“A Black Lady Sketch Show”
“Saturday Night Live”

Television Academy rules say this category should no longer exist, because there simply aren’t enough sketch shows to make a competitive field. But there was such an outcry when the Academy announced plans to merge this category with the talk-series category that they changed their minds. With a paltry nine shows qualifying for consideration, the rules limited the category to two nominees, one of which is the winningest show in Emmy history, “Saturday Night Live.” “SNL” might lose eventually (most likely when the Academy succeeds in merging this category), but it’s won four consecutive years, and its nine victories at the Creative Arts Emmys last weekend suggest that it’ll make it five in a row.

Predicted winner: “Saturday Night Live”

Daveed Diggs in HamiltonDaveed Diggs in Hamilton

Disney+

Outstanding Variety Special (Pre-Recorded)

Nominees:
“Bo Burnham: Inside”
“David Byrne’s American Utopia”
“8:46 – Dave Chappelle”
“Friends: The Reunion”
“Hamilton”
“A West Wing Special to Benefit When We All Vote”

This is a beast of a category, with nominees that include the film version of “Hamilton,” with its seven acting nominations; “Bo Burnham: Inside,” a critically adored one-man show that has already won Burnham awards for writing, directing and music direction; “David Byrne’s American Utopia,” directed by no less than Spike Lee; and “8:46 – Dave Chappelle,” the latest comedy special from the man who has won two of the last three awards in this category.

At one point, “Hamilton” seemed like the clear frontrunner here – but “Inside,” which dropped the day before the end of Emmy eligibility, came on very strong at exactly the right moment. The race is probably neck-and-neck between the two, one traditional and the other weirder and more adventurous. (How strange is it that a multiracial hip-hop musical about the founding fathers can be seen as the conservative choice?) Depending on how the age of voters in the category skews, this could go either direction.

Predicted winner: “Hamilton”

Outstanding Writing for A Variety Series

Nominees:
“The Amber Ruffin Show”
“A Black Lady Sketch Show”
“Last Week Tonight With John Oliver”
“Late Show With Stephen Colbert”
“Saturday Night Live”

When “Last Week Tonight With John Oliver” wins Outstanding Variety Talk Series, it also wins this category. In fact, no show has ever won Outstanding Variety Talk Series without also winning this category, which means that Oliver is pretty much a lock here. Plus, the one show that has a chance to knock him off in the talk-series category, “Conan,” isn’t nominated here – so even if Oliver loses that category, he won’t lose this one.

Predicted winner: “Last Week Tonight With John Oliver”

Outstanding Competition Program

Nominees:

“The Amazing Race”
“Nailed It!”
“RuPaul’s Drag Race”
“Top Chef”
“The Voice”

Competition program is another category where voters love streaks: “The Amazing Race” won for seven years in a row, “The Voice” won for three, and now “RuPaul’s Drag Race” is on a roll with three straight wins. And considering that it won five awards at the Creative Arts Emmys while none of its fellow nominees won any, it’d be a shock if it doesn’t extend its streak to six, even up against the category’s all-time winner, “The Amazing Race,” and the up-and-coming “Nailed It!”

Predicted winner: “RuPaul’s Drag Race”

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