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September 2021 Newsletter: Dementia – Written By Dr. Jerry J. Masarira, Naturopath D. CBIS.

Dementia is one of the most prevalent brain problems of the 21century. There are many brain disorders that are named dementia when there are not. This year 2021 there are over 50 million in the world living with dementia. This number is projected to double every 20 years. The risk of getting dementia increases as one gets older. 

             What is dementia? Etymologically, the term dementia, is Latin derived, when “de” (is to depart) and “mens” (means, mind). This is when the mind is departing from its normal functions. 

              This is not a disease but a neurological and psychiatric syndrome that covers a broad spectrum of diseases and conditions. 

Dementia has symptoms that indicate a decline in mental ability. The symptoms must be longer that six months and not have been present since birth. Dementia or senility are not caused by aging as such, but by some brain diseases. There is a gradual loss of cognitive abilities.  

                 For one to be classified as having dementia, must have two of the following five core mental functions significantly affected: 

  1. Communication and language. 
    1. Visual perception. 
    1. Reasoning and judgement. 
    1.  Ability to focus and pay attention. 
    1. Memory.  

The myths about dementia that need to be understood are as follows: 

     1. Demetia is a natural part of aging. 

     2. That only old people get dementia.  

     3. That Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are the same. (Dementia is a broad, umbrella term covering various types of diseases and conditions. Alzheimer’s disease is A TYPE, of Dementia) 

     4. That people with Dementia do not know what they want and do not understand what is going on around them. 

     5. That memory loss is equivalent to Dementia. 

     6. Or, if there is no memory loss there is no Dementia. 

     7. A person diagnosed with Dementia is mentally incompetent. (Not necessarily) 

     8. Dementia causes aggression and violence. 

     9. People with Dementia become like children. 

In 1901 a 50 year old woman was the first identified case of Alzheimer’s disease. It was named after her treating physician, the German psychiatrist Alois Alzheimer. He made a public report of her condition in 1906 after his patient passed.  

             There are different classes of Dementia: 

  1. Cortical and subcortical Dementia.  

     (cortical is when the brain’s gray matter, cortex, is affected) 

     (Subcortical affects the brain’s white matter, or beneath the cortex) 

    2. Primary and secondary Dementia. 

       (Seconday means dementia is the result of another illness, disease, trauma or injury)  

        (Example of primary cause is, Alzheimers) 

The purpose of identifying secondary and primary causes is important for treatment and prognosis. 

    3. Reversible and Irreversible Dementia. 

       (Reversible, responds to treatments’ and irreversible does not respond to treatment and is progressive) 

       We have a website for you to communicate for consultations and also training you as a medical missionary. There are other services you may find useful. On the website We recorded over 100 audio weekly lessons and old monthly news-letters you might have missed from the past. Feel free to read and listen. Pass the website link to as many people as you want across the globe. 

www.enprohealthinstitute.com 

If you have any questions, please contact me at: 

enproinstitutenews@aol.com 

Dr. Jerry J. Masarira, Naturopath D. CBIS.

Enpro Consultant and Certified Brain Injury Specialist.

Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA.

Alt. drmasarirajj@aol.com

Jerry J. Masarira

drmasarirajj@gmail.com

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Guinea declares end of Marburg virus outbreak – Reuters

Matshidiso Moeti, World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Director for Africa, attends a briefing for World Health Assembly (WHA) delegates on the Ebola outbreak response in Democratic Republic of the Congo at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, May 23, 2018. REUTERS/Denis BalibouseCONAKRY, Sept 16 (Reuters) – An outbreak of the deadly Marburg virus in Guinea is officially over, health authorities said on Thursday, less than six weeks since West Africa’s first ever case of the disease was detected.No further cases were confirmed by health workers monitoring the 170 high-risk contacts of the first patient, who was diagnosed after succumbing to the highly infectious hemorrhagic fever. read more The outbreak came just two months after the country was declared free of Ebola following a brief flare-up earlier this year that killed 12 people.”Today we can point to the growing expertise in outbreak response in Guinea and the region that has saved lives, contained and averted a spill-over of the Marburg virus,” said Matshidiso Moeti, the World Health Organization’s (WHO) regional director for Africa.”Without immediate and decisive action, highly infectious diseases like Marburg can easily get out of hand,” she said in a statement.Both the Marburg case and this year’s Ebola cases were detected in Guinea’s Gueckedou district, near the borders with Liberia and Sierra Leone. The first cases of the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic – the largest in history – also were from the same area in Southeastern Guinea’s forest region.There have been 12 major Marburg outbreaks since 1967, mostly in southern and eastern Africa. Fatality rates have varied from 24% to 88% in past outbreaks depending on the virus strain and case management, according to the WHO.Transmission occurs through contact with infected body fluids and tissue. Symptoms include headache, vomiting blood, muscle pains and bleeding through various orifices.Reporting by Saliou Samb and Bate Felix; Writing by Alessandra Prentice; Editing by Bill BerkrotOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Matshidiso Moeti, World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Director for Africa, attends a briefing for World Health Assembly (WHA) delegates on the Ebola outbreak response in Democratic Republic of the Congo at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, May 23, 2018. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse

CONAKRY, Sept 16 (Reuters) – An outbreak of the deadly Marburg virus in Guinea is officially over, health authorities said on Thursday, less than six weeks since West Africa’s first ever case of the disease was detected.

No further cases were confirmed by health workers monitoring the 170 high-risk contacts of the first patient, who was diagnosed after succumbing to the highly infectious hemorrhagic fever. read more

The outbreak came just two months after the country was declared free of Ebola following a brief flare-up earlier this year that killed 12 people.

“Today we can point to the growing expertise in outbreak response in Guinea and the region that has saved lives, contained and averted a spill-over of the Marburg virus,” said Matshidiso Moeti, the World Health Organization’s (WHO) regional director for Africa.

“Without immediate and decisive action, highly infectious diseases like Marburg can easily get out of hand,” she said in a statement.

Both the Marburg case and this year’s Ebola cases were detected in Guinea’s Gueckedou district, near the borders with Liberia and Sierra Leone. The first cases of the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic – the largest in history – also were from the same area in Southeastern Guinea’s forest region.

There have been 12 major Marburg outbreaks since 1967, mostly in southern and eastern Africa. Fatality rates have varied from 24% to 88% in past outbreaks depending on the virus strain and case management, according to the WHO.

Transmission occurs through contact with infected body fluids and tissue. Symptoms include headache, vomiting blood, muscle pains and bleeding through various orifices.

Reporting by Saliou Samb and Bate Felix; Writing by Alessandra Prentice; Editing by Bill Berkrot

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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WHO, global health leaders in plea for accelerated vaccination efforts in Africa and abroad – Homeland Preparedness News

© Shutterstock

Vaccine equity is in need of a boost globally, and in Africa in particular, and unless that changes, World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus and other health leaders said this week the COVID-19 pandemic may never end.
Cooperation is the key to ending the pandemic, these experts stressed in a press conference, which followed two days of meetings. Highlighting the divide that remains, Tedros pointed to the fact that while more than 5.7 billion doses of COVID-19 vaccines have been administered worldwide, only 2 percent of those have reached Africa. That could have wider reaching consequences.
“This doesn’t only hurt the people of Africa, it hurts all of us,” Tedros said. “The longer vaccine inequity persists, the more the virus will keep circulating and changing, the longer the social and economic disruption will continue, and the higher the chances that more variants will emerge that render vaccines less effective.”
Currently, WHO’s global vaccination target is set at 70 percent among the population of all countries by mid-2022. More specifically, it seeks to vaccinate at least 10 percent of the population of every country by September 2021, at least 40 percent by the end of the year, as a path to the 70 percent overall ambition.
Among those who joined Tedros in restating these goal were Dr. Seth Berkley, CEO of Gavi; Strive Masiyima, AU Special Envoy for COVID-19; Dr. John Nkengasong, Africa CDC Director; professor Benedict Oramah, president and chairman of the Board of Directors at Afreximbank; Dr. Vera Songwe, UN Under-Secretary-General and Executive Secretary of the Economic Commission For Africa; and Dr. Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa.
“We will not be able to achieve 60 percent of our population fully immunized if we do not fully explore and deploy the power of partnership, the power of cooperation, and the power of solidarity,” Nkengasong said. ”We all have acknowledged now that vaccines are the only solution for us to get out of this pandemic collectively. That has to be done quickly.”
To date, Songwe elaborated, every single month of lockdowns in Africa cost the continent $29 billion of production. This has left economies struggling and in desperate need of financing to be able to properly respond to the crisis. Building on this, Oramah added that Africa did not seek to be at the bottom of a vaccine queue — it’s simply how things shook out, and it wants to achieve economic recovery and a controlled viral situation alike.
“We know that scarcity means increased cost, and we cannot afford today as a continent that kind of scarcity,” Songwe said.

© Shutterstock

Vaccine equity is in need of a boost globally, and in Africa in particular, and unless that changes, World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus and other health leaders said this week the COVID-19 pandemic may never end.

Cooperation is the key to ending the pandemic, these experts stressed in a press conference, which followed two days of meetings. Highlighting the divide that remains, Tedros pointed to the fact that while more than 5.7 billion doses of COVID-19 vaccines have been administered worldwide, only 2 percent of those have reached Africa. That could have wider reaching consequences.

“This doesn’t only hurt the people of Africa, it hurts all of us,” Tedros said. “The longer vaccine inequity persists, the more the virus will keep circulating and changing, the longer the social and economic disruption will continue, and the higher the chances that more variants will emerge that render vaccines less effective.”

Currently, WHO’s global vaccination target is set at 70 percent among the population of all countries by mid-2022. More specifically, it seeks to vaccinate at least 10 percent of the population of every country by September 2021, at least 40 percent by the end of the year, as a path to the 70 percent overall ambition.

Among those who joined Tedros in restating these goal were Dr. Seth Berkley, CEO of Gavi; Strive Masiyima, AU Special Envoy for COVID-19; Dr. John Nkengasong, Africa CDC Director; professor Benedict Oramah, president and chairman of the Board of Directors at Afreximbank; Dr. Vera Songwe, UN Under-Secretary-General and Executive Secretary of the Economic Commission For Africa; and Dr. Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa.

“We will not be able to achieve 60 percent of our population fully immunized if we do not fully explore and deploy the power of partnership, the power of cooperation, and the power of solidarity,” Nkengasong said. ”We all have acknowledged now that vaccines are the only solution for us to get out of this pandemic collectively. That has to be done quickly.”

To date, Songwe elaborated, every single month of lockdowns in Africa cost the continent $29 billion of production. This has left economies struggling and in desperate need of financing to be able to properly respond to the crisis. Building on this, Oramah added that Africa did not seek to be at the bottom of a vaccine queue — it’s simply how things shook out, and it wants to achieve economic recovery and a controlled viral situation alike.

“We know that scarcity means increased cost, and we cannot afford today as a continent that kind of scarcity,” Songwe said.

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Alaska joins Idaho in rationing health care as hospitals are packed with COVID patients, and WHO says Africa is being left behind in vaccine push – MarketWatch

The biggest hospital in Alaska has joined hospitals in northern Idaho in starting to ration care, as it has become overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients driven by the highly transmissible delta variant, forcing people with other medical issues to wait for hours for treatment. Providence Alaska Medical Center in Anchorage is now operating under “crisis standards of care,” the New York Times reported, meaning it is carefully allocating resources that may cause some patients to receive substandard care.

Hospitals in Idaho were forced to do the same last week as their intensive-care beds were overwhelmed by COVID patients. Both states have lower-than-average vaccination rates. Idaho has fully vaccinated 40% of its population, according to USAFacts.org, while Alaska has inoculated 48% of its population. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s vaccine tracker shows that 54% of the overall U.S. population is fully vaccinated, having received two doses of the vaccines developed by Pfizer
PFE,
+0.13%
with German partner BioNTech
BNTX,
+6.08%
or by Moderna
MRNA,
+1.58%,
or one dose of Johnson & Johnson’s
JNJ,
+0.38%
single-shot regimen. Some 63.2% of the population has received at least one dose.

SOURCE: CDC

The U.S. is averaging 152,177 new cases a day, 99,275 hospitalizations and 1,888 deaths, according to a Times tracker. That means the nation is suffering more deaths than in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, every two days. The vast majority of deaths and cases are among unvaccinated people, to the chagrin of health experts who are pushing hard for people to get their shots and avoid dying a preventable death. The numbers are currently tracking close to where they were last winter. See also: Number of children and teens with COVID-19 exceeds 250,000 for first time since start of pandemic, as mask and vaccination fights continue While almost 30% of Americans refuse vaccination, other parts of the world are crying out for supply, including Africa, where several countries have so far vaccinated less than 1% of their populations. World Health Organization head Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said Tuesday that Africa has been left behind by the rest of the world. “More than 5.7 million doses have been administered globally but only 2% of those have been administered in Africa,” Tedros said at a press briefing. “This leaves people at high risk of disease and death, exposed to a deadly virus against which many other people around the world enjoy protection.”

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Dispatches from a Pandemic: COVID-19 long haulers are frustrated with unvaccinated friends, worried about reinfection, and mired in medical bills That’s bad news for Africa, but also for the entire world, observed Tedros, reiterating a message that, as long as major swaths of the world are unvaccinated, the virus can keep adapting and changing and eventually produce a variant that could prove entirely resistant to vaccines. Don’t miss: ‘Shoulda Got the Shot’: New PSAs employ real people rather than science and data to encourage unvaccinated Americans to change their minds Africa has a population of 1.3 billion and is targeting 60% vaccination, equal to just under 800 million people. Tedros has called for a moratorium on boosters until the whole world has received initial vaccine doses, but countries including Israel, France and Germany have started to offer booster shots, mostly to people with compromised immune systems. See: Long COVID risks halved by dual vaccination, study finds A U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel will meet on Friday to discuss data provided by Pfizer on boosters. Data released by the company ahead of the meeting suggested that people who are at least 16 years old should get a booster shot after six months. In a document published Wednesday, Pfizer said a Phase 3 substudy examined 306 people between the ages of 18 and 55 who had gotten a third dose. It found that an extra dose is considered safe and increased neutralizing antibody titers against the original strain of the virus, as well as the beta and delta variants, to a higher rate than what was reported after two doses in the clinical trials last year. For more: Pfizer cites ‘totality’ of clinical data in bid for COVID-19 booster approval Separately, Pfizer executives said at a conference that they expect to share data on the safety and efficacy of their vaccine in children between 5 and 11 years old by the end of September, with plans to file for emergency-use authorization in the U.S. in early October. Clinical data for children 6 months old to 5 years old are expected shortly after. “All of that depends on having a positive outcome on the data, right? I’m assuming that in terms of all the dates I’m giving you,” Pfizer CFO Frank D’Amelio told investors Tuesday at the Morgan Stanley Global Healthcare Conference, according to a FactSet transcript of the presentation.

Recent studies have shown that the effectiveness of Covid-19 vaccines is decreasing, though experts say the shots still work well. WSJ explains what the numbers mean and why they don’t tell the full story. Photo illustration: Jacob Reynolds/WSJ

In other medical news, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc.
REGN,
+1.06%
said the U.S. government had purchased an additional 1.4 million doses of its monoclonal-antibody treatment for COVID-19 for $2.9 billion. The treatment, which costs $2,100 per dose, is free to Americans at high risk of hospitalization and death who have tested positive or have been exposed to the virus. Eli Lilly
LLY,
+0.27%
said the government has ordered 388,000 doses of etesevimab, which has been authorized for emergency use as a COVID-19 treatment, for $330 million. As part of the deal, about 200,000 doses of etesevimab, which complements doses of bamlanivimab previously purchased by the U.S. government, are expected to ship in the third quarter of this year, with the remaining doses to be shipped in the fourth quarter. Overseas, the European Union will donate 200 million doses of vaccine by the middle of next year, European Commission President Ursula Von der Leyen said in her annual address. In France, thousands of unvaccinated healthcare workers are facing suspension without pay from Wednesday, the Guardian reported. President Emmanuel Macron gave workers including staff at hospitals, retirement home workers and the fire service — 2.7 million people — an ultimatum injury to get at least one shot by Sept. 15 or resign. There was disappointing news from Singapore, where new cases totaled 837 on Tuesday, the highest single-day figure in more than a year, as reported by the Guardian. Singapore has vaccinated about 80% of its population but is being hit by the delta variant. Vaccinated people have been proven to be far less likely to develop severe illness or die of it. See also: When can kids under 12 get a COVID-19 vaccine? CDC Director Rochelle Walensky has an answer.Latest tallies The global tally for the coronavirus-borne illness climbed above 225.9 million on Wednesday, while the death toll rose to 4.65 million, according to data aggregated by Johns Hopkins University. The U.S. continues to lead the world with a total of 41.4 million cases and 663,970 deaths.  India is second by cases after the U.S. at 33.3 million and has suffered 443,497 deaths. Brazil has second highest death toll at 587,797 and has recorded 21 million cases. In Europe, Russia has had the most fatalities with 191,566, followed by the U.K. at 134,774. China, where the virus was first discovered late in 2019, has had 107,625 confirmed cases and 4,849 deaths, according to its official numbers, which are widely held to be massively underreported.

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The biggest hospital in Alaska has joined hospitals in northern Idaho in starting to ration care, as it has become overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients driven by the highly transmissible delta variant, forcing people with other medical issues to wait for hours for treatment.

Providence Alaska Medical Center in Anchorage is now operating under “crisis standards of care,” the New York Times reported, meaning it is carefully allocating resources that may cause some patients to receive substandard care.

Hospitals in Idaho were forced to do the same last week as their intensive-care beds were overwhelmed by COVID patients. Both states have lower-than-average vaccination rates. Idaho has fully vaccinated 40% of its population, according to USAFacts.org, while Alaska has inoculated 48% of its population.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s vaccine tracker shows that 54% of the overall U.S. population is fully vaccinated, having received two doses of the vaccines developed by Pfizer
PFE,
+0.13%

with German partner BioNTech
BNTX,
+6.08%

or by Moderna
MRNA,
+1.58%
,
or one dose of Johnson & Johnson’s
JNJ,
+0.38%

single-shot regimen. Some 63.2% of the population has received at least one dose.

SOURCE: CDC

The U.S. is averaging 152,177 new cases a day, 99,275 hospitalizations and 1,888 deaths, according to a Times tracker. That means the nation is suffering more deaths than in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, every two days.

The vast majority of deaths and cases are among unvaccinated people, to the chagrin of health experts who are pushing hard for people to get their shots and avoid dying a preventable death. The numbers are currently tracking close to where they were last winter.

See also: Number of children and teens with COVID-19 exceeds 250,000 for first time since start of pandemic, as mask and vaccination fights continue

While almost 30% of Americans refuse vaccination, other parts of the world are crying out for supply, including Africa, where several countries have so far vaccinated less than 1% of their populations.

World Health Organization head Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said Tuesday that Africa has been left behind by the rest of the world. “More than 5.7 million doses have been administered globally but only 2% of those have been administered in Africa,” Tedros said at a press briefing. “This leaves people at high risk of disease and death, exposed to a deadly virus against which many other people around the world enjoy protection.”

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position:relative;
padding-bottom:56.25%;
}

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position: absolute;
left: 0;
top: 0;
width: 100%;
height: 100%;
}

Dispatches from a Pandemic: COVID-19 long haulers are frustrated with unvaccinated friends, worried about reinfection, and mired in medical bills

That’s bad news for Africa, but also for the entire world, observed Tedros, reiterating a message that, as long as major swaths of the world are unvaccinated, the virus can keep adapting and changing and eventually produce a variant that could prove entirely resistant to vaccines.

Don’t miss: ‘Shoulda Got the Shot’: New PSAs employ real people rather than science and data to encourage unvaccinated Americans to change their minds

Africa has a population of 1.3 billion and is targeting 60% vaccination, equal to just under 800 million people.

Tedros has called for a moratorium on boosters until the whole world has received initial vaccine doses, but countries including Israel, France and Germany have started to offer booster shots, mostly to people with compromised immune systems.

See: Long COVID risks halved by dual vaccination, study finds

A U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel will meet on Friday to discuss data provided by Pfizer on boosters. Data released by the company ahead of the meeting suggested that people who are at least 16 years old should get a booster shot after six months.

In a document published Wednesday, Pfizer said a Phase 3 substudy examined 306 people between the ages of 18 and 55 who had gotten a third dose. It found that an extra dose is considered safe and increased neutralizing antibody titers against the original strain of the virus, as well as the beta and delta variants, to a higher rate than what was reported after two doses in the clinical trials last year.

For more: Pfizer cites ‘totality’ of clinical data in bid for COVID-19 booster approval

Separately, Pfizer executives said at a conference that they expect to share data on the safety and efficacy of their vaccine in children between 5 and 11 years old by the end of September, with plans to file for emergency-use authorization in the U.S. in early October. Clinical data for children 6 months old to 5 years old are expected shortly after.

“All of that depends on having a positive outcome on the data, right? I’m assuming that in terms of all the dates I’m giving you,” Pfizer CFO Frank D’Amelio told investors Tuesday at the Morgan Stanley Global Healthcare Conference, according to a FactSet transcript of the presentation.

Recent studies have shown that the effectiveness of Covid-19 vaccines is decreasing, though experts say the shots still work well. WSJ explains what the numbers mean and why they don’t tell the full story. Photo illustration: Jacob Reynolds/WSJ

In other medical news, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc.
REGN,
+1.06%

said the U.S. government had purchased an additional 1.4 million doses of its monoclonal-antibody treatment for COVID-19 for $2.9 billion. The treatment, which costs $2,100 per dose, is free to Americans at high risk of hospitalization and death who have tested positive or have been exposed to the virus.

Eli Lilly
LLY,
+0.27%

said the government has ordered 388,000 doses of etesevimab, which has been authorized for emergency use as a COVID-19 treatment, for $330 million. As part of the deal, about 200,000 doses of etesevimab, which complements doses of bamlanivimab previously purchased by the U.S. government, are expected to ship in the third quarter of this year, with the remaining doses to be shipped in the fourth quarter.

Overseas, the European Union will donate 200 million doses of vaccine by the middle of next year, European Commission President Ursula Von der Leyen said in her annual address.

In France, thousands of unvaccinated healthcare workers are facing suspension without pay from Wednesday, the Guardian reported. President Emmanuel Macron gave workers including staff at hospitals, retirement home workers and the fire service — 2.7 million people — an ultimatum injury to get at least one shot by Sept. 15 or resign.

There was disappointing news from Singapore, where new cases totaled 837 on Tuesday, the highest single-day figure in more than a year, as reported by the Guardian. Singapore has vaccinated about 80% of its population but is being hit by the delta variant. Vaccinated people have been proven to be far less likely to develop severe illness or die of it.

See also: When can kids under 12 get a COVID-19 vaccine? CDC Director Rochelle Walensky has an answer.

Latest tallies

The global tally for the coronavirus-borne illness climbed above 225.9 million on Wednesday, while the death toll rose to 4.65 million, according to data aggregated by Johns Hopkins University.

The U.S. continues to lead the world with a total of 41.4 million cases and 663,970 deaths. 

India is second by cases after the U.S. at 33.3 million and has suffered 443,497 deaths.

Brazil has second highest death toll at 587,797 and has recorded 21 million cases.

In Europe, Russia has had the most fatalities with 191,566, followed by the U.K. at 134,774.

China, where the virus was first discovered late in 2019, has had 107,625 confirmed cases and 4,849 deaths, according to its official numbers, which are widely held to be massively underreported.

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