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SPECIALISED EMOTIONAL WELLNESS TRAINING with Dr Francis (Munangi) Mpindu, PHD.

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Malaysia to delay transition to Covid-19 endemic phase due to Omicron concerns – The Straits Times

KUALA LUMPUR (THE STAR/ASIA NEWS NETWORK) – Malaysia has decided to delay the transition into the endemic phase as there is too much uncertainty regarding the recent spread of the Covid-19 Omicron variant, said Defence Minister Hishammuddin Hussein.
He said this was decided by the Cabinet after its Quartet Ministers meeting on Tuesday (Nov 30).
“Most importantly, for now, the Quartet Meeting decided to temporarily put a pause on our efforts in transitioning to the endemic stage until we know more about the Omicron variant,” said Datuk Seri Hishammuddin during a press conference in Parliament.

He said the Omicron variant was deliberated at length during the meeting earlier, adding that if there is another wave of Covid-19 infections, it could put Malaysia’s progress in the pandemic at risk.
“If we don’t monitor Omicron closely, then how are we supposed to deal with it?” he asked.
He also said Putrajaya is monitoring countries where Omicron has spread and added that the situation remains fluid at the moment.

However, he assured that there will be no changes in the country’s international tourism programme in Langkawi.
At the same time, he also said matters of domestic travel were also addressed together with Transport Minister Wee Ka Siong and representatives from the Tourism, Arts and Culture Ministry.
“They were considering other tourism bubble locations after Langkawi,” he added.
Regarding Langkawi as a success, Mr Hishammuddin said there will soon be an announcement by the Tourism, Arts and Culture Ministry with Prime Minister Ismail Sabri Yaakob.
Meanwhile, Mr Hishammuddin also said the ban on African countries – South Africa, Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia and Zimbabwe – were not based on geopolitics, but health.
“I believe that these African countries understand that it isn’t about diplomacy or geopolitics, but health. We don’t want to jeopardise our progress since 1½ years ago with irresponsible decisions,” said Mr Hishammuddin.
Meanwhile, Mr Hishammuddin also said that after the launch of the Vaccinated Travel Lane (VTL) scheme between Malaysia and Singapore, the government is also considering opening up other similar routes to Kuching, Penang and Langkawi.
“I have asked all sides to continue discussions with the concerned countries and we will not make a decision until we know the real impact of Omicron. I hope everyone in our country will remain vigilant and not take risks,” he said.
For now, the land VTL initiative, which allows quarantine-free travel, is only for vaccinated individuals who are citizens, permanent residents and long-term pass holders of Malaysia and Singapore.

KUALA LUMPUR (THE STAR/ASIA NEWS NETWORK) – Malaysia has decided to delay the transition into the endemic phase as there is too much uncertainty regarding the recent spread of the Covid-19 Omicron variant, said Defence Minister Hishammuddin Hussein.

He said this was decided by the Cabinet after its Quartet Ministers meeting on Tuesday (Nov 30).

“Most importantly, for now, the Quartet Meeting decided to temporarily put a pause on our efforts in transitioning to the endemic stage until we know more about the Omicron variant,” said Datuk Seri Hishammuddin during a press conference in Parliament.

He said the Omicron variant was deliberated at length during the meeting earlier, adding that if there is another wave of Covid-19 infections, it could put Malaysia’s progress in the pandemic at risk.

“If we don’t monitor Omicron closely, then how are we supposed to deal with it?” he asked.

He also said Putrajaya is monitoring countries where Omicron has spread and added that the situation remains fluid at the moment.

However, he assured that there will be no changes in the country’s international tourism programme in Langkawi.

At the same time, he also said matters of domestic travel were also addressed together with Transport Minister Wee Ka Siong and representatives from the Tourism, Arts and Culture Ministry.

“They were considering other tourism bubble locations after Langkawi,” he added.

Regarding Langkawi as a success, Mr Hishammuddin said there will soon be an announcement by the Tourism, Arts and Culture Ministry with Prime Minister Ismail Sabri Yaakob.

Meanwhile, Mr Hishammuddin also said the ban on African countries – South Africa, Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia and Zimbabwe – were not based on geopolitics, but health.

“I believe that these African countries understand that it isn’t about diplomacy or geopolitics, but health. We don’t want to jeopardise our progress since 1½ years ago with irresponsible decisions,” said Mr Hishammuddin.

Meanwhile, Mr Hishammuddin also said that after the launch of the Vaccinated Travel Lane (VTL) scheme between Malaysia and Singapore, the government is also considering opening up other similar routes to Kuching, Penang and Langkawi.

“I have asked all sides to continue discussions with the concerned countries and we will not make a decision until we know the real impact of Omicron. I hope everyone in our country will remain vigilant and not take risks,” he said.

For now, the land VTL initiative, which allows quarantine-free travel, is only for vaccinated individuals who are citizens, permanent residents and long-term pass holders of Malaysia and Singapore.

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Preservation award honors N.J. town founded by African-Americans decades before the Civil War – nj.com

A Salem County historian has been honored for her contribution in documenting an African-American antebellum community in New Jersey.Janet Sheridan was singled out last month for her efforts in getting Marshalltown, an unincorporated part of what is now Mannington in Salem County, listed as a historic district on the state and national registers of historic places.Marshalltown was an antebellum free-Black community established in 1834.Preservation New Jersey, a statewide, non-profit historic preservation organization, honored Sheridan for her research methods, which the group believes will lead to more historically-Black communities in New Jersey to also gain historic register status.The nomination included detailed recording of a house, a church, a schoolhouse, two cemeteries, deed-mapped and oral histories. Marshalltown was added to the state and national historic register in 2013, but Preservation New Jersey decided to honor Sheridan and her effort once again as an example of how to bring important historic sites into wider acknowledgement.“This is the first listing of an African American settlement in New Jersey,” Sheridan told NJ Advance Media. “Lots of settlements were started before the Civil War in New Jersey. This shows us how African Americans established places to settle and live freely.”This school house in what is now Mannington, Salem County is one of the surviving buildings from Marshalltown, a community started by African-Americans in 1834.Other antebellum Black communities in New Jersey include Timbuctoo (1820) in Burlington County and Lawnside (1840) in Camden County.Thomas Marshall was a free Black man who started buying property near Salem City in 1826. He eventually amassed a nearly 90-acre farm and acquired more land that he sold to other free Blacks.The community thrived during a time when Quaker religious leaders espoused the end of slavery and pushed for whites who owned slaves and farmed in the area to set them free, Preservation New Jersey officials said.“Lots of people, when they think about slavery, racial segregation, think it was something that only happened in the South,” said Emily Manz, executive director of Preservation New Jersey. “New Jersey had slavery.”The push to recognize important sites in New Jersey history acknowledging African-American communities is also getting attention in Trenton. Senator Michael Testa, R-1, Cape May County, and Assemblyman Antwan McClellan, R-1, Cape May County, are co-sponsoring a measure in the state Legislature to “promote awareness and appreciation of Black history.”“The lives of African people and their descendants have contributed greatly to the fabric of New Jersey history for almost four centuries,” Testa said in a statement. “Highlighting significant locations and events, the Black Heritage Trail will bring attention to those men and women who impacted industry, culture, arts and everyday life in New Jersey, but whose stories have too often been overlooked. It is the right thing to do, and it is long overdue.”McClellan pointed out other sites in the state that deserve attention.“The trail will connect the stories of Black life and resiliency in our state,” McClellan said in a statement. “From the new Harriet Tubman Museum in Cape May here in the 1st District to the Hinchliffe Negro League Baseball Stadium in Newark, Black history and accomplishments are a rich part of the history of New Jersey.”McClellan’s bill was approved by the Assembly by a 73-0 vote in June.The state would maintain a website with information about the Black Heritage Trail and related attractions if the measure is signed into law.This church is one of the surviving Marshalltown buildings in what is now Mannington.While Thomas Marshall’s name is still associated with the community he helped found, his personal story ended in tragedy. After he died in 1856, debtors seized most of his land and assets. His wife and sons eventually settled on a small plot of land they were able to hold on to, Sheridan said.A house, a church, a schoolhouse, and two cemeteries still stand in the area and helped provide a trail for Sheridan to piece together the past and tell the story of why it is important to remember.“It’s a shame that some of the people who live in Salem do not appreciate the history here,” Sheridan said.Please subscribe now and support the local journalism you rely on and trust.Bill Duhart may be reached at bduhart@njadvancemedia.com.

A Salem County historian has been honored for her contribution in documenting an African-American antebellum community in New Jersey.

Janet Sheridan was singled out last month for her efforts in getting Marshalltown, an unincorporated part of what is now Mannington in Salem County, listed as a historic district on the state and national registers of historic places.

Marshalltown was an antebellum free-Black community established in 1834.

Preservation New Jersey, a statewide, non-profit historic preservation organization, honored Sheridan for her research methods, which the group believes will lead to more historically-Black communities in New Jersey to also gain historic register status.

The nomination included detailed recording of a house, a church, a schoolhouse, two cemeteries, deed-mapped and oral histories. Marshalltown was added to the state and national historic register in 2013, but Preservation New Jersey decided to honor Sheridan and her effort once again as an example of how to bring important historic sites into wider acknowledgement.

“This is the first listing of an African American settlement in New Jersey,” Sheridan told NJ Advance Media. “Lots of settlements were started before the Civil War in New Jersey. This shows us how African Americans established places to settle and live freely.”

Marshalltown, historic Black N.J. community

This school house in what is now Mannington, Salem County is one of the surviving buildings from Marshalltown, a community started by African-Americans in 1834.

Other antebellum Black communities in New Jersey include Timbuctoo (1820) in Burlington County and Lawnside (1840) in Camden County.

Thomas Marshall was a free Black man who started buying property near Salem City in 1826. He eventually amassed a nearly 90-acre farm and acquired more land that he sold to other free Blacks.

The community thrived during a time when Quaker religious leaders espoused the end of slavery and pushed for whites who owned slaves and farmed in the area to set them free, Preservation New Jersey officials said.

“Lots of people, when they think about slavery, racial segregation, think it was something that only happened in the South,” said Emily Manz, executive director of Preservation New Jersey. “New Jersey had slavery.”

The push to recognize important sites in New Jersey history acknowledging African-American communities is also getting attention in Trenton. Senator Michael Testa, R-1, Cape May County, and Assemblyman Antwan McClellan, R-1, Cape May County, are co-sponsoring a measure in the state Legislature to “promote awareness and appreciation of Black history.”

“The lives of African people and their descendants have contributed greatly to the fabric of New Jersey history for almost four centuries,” Testa said in a statement. “Highlighting significant locations and events, the Black Heritage Trail will bring attention to those men and women who impacted industry, culture, arts and everyday life in New Jersey, but whose stories have too often been overlooked. It is the right thing to do, and it is long overdue.”

McClellan pointed out other sites in the state that deserve attention.

“The trail will connect the stories of Black life and resiliency in our state,” McClellan said in a statement. “From the new Harriet Tubman Museum in Cape May here in the 1st District to the Hinchliffe Negro League Baseball Stadium in Newark, Black history and accomplishments are a rich part of the history of New Jersey.”

McClellan’s bill was approved by the Assembly by a 73-0 vote in June.

The state would maintain a website with information about the Black Heritage Trail and related attractions if the measure is signed into law.

Marshalltown, historic Black N.J. community

This church is one of the surviving Marshalltown buildings in what is now Mannington.

While Thomas Marshall’s name is still associated with the community he helped found, his personal story ended in tragedy. After he died in 1856, debtors seized most of his land and assets. His wife and sons eventually settled on a small plot of land they were able to hold on to, Sheridan said.

A house, a church, a schoolhouse, and two cemeteries still stand in the area and helped provide a trail for Sheridan to piece together the past and tell the story of why it is important to remember.

“It’s a shame that some of the people who live in Salem do not appreciate the history here,” Sheridan said.

Please subscribe now and support the local journalism you rely on and trust.

Bill Duhart may be reached at bduhart@njadvancemedia.com.

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arts and culture

National Art Gallery hosts curatorship programme – NewsDay

BY TENDAI SAUTANATIONAL Gallery of Zimbabwe (NGZ) has partnered with AfroCuration to host a hybrid mentorship programme to train youths aged between 18 and 26 how to tell their stories through WikiAfrica, an imitation version of Wikipedia.
In a statement, NGZ spokesperson Zvikomborero Mandangu said the two-day programme, which is open to local youths in colleges and universities, will start on December 9 in Harare and will feature influential speakers from the arts and culture sector.
“The AfroCuration event will focus on coaching young writers and artists to engage in global debate in support of the decolonisation discourse, as it is high time that the African story must be told by Africans,” he said.

“Focus for the AfroCuration workshop will be to mentor these young minds into tackling topical issues like families and community colonial experiences, decolonising education and heritage, nationalism and contemporary art in Zimbabwe, religion and belief systems, Zimbabwean diet, beauty and family.”
Mandangu said the WikiAfrica movement had consistently instigated and led multi-faceted innovative initiatives that had activated communities and driven content to Wikipedia.
“In a way, WikiAfrica will be highly complementary to the Africa scholars who have globally reputable thesis positions, but lack visibility due to lack of effective knowledge transfer mechanisms and efficient information management systems for African bodies of knowledge,” he said.
“The WikiAfrica education programme aims to change and introduce a new generation of editors based in Africa to Wikipedia. While learning about knowledge systems, theory of knowledge and critical thought, the students will also be contributing vital, researched articles that reflect their geographic and social realities.”
Mandangu said the just-ended International Conference on African Culture resolved to retrieve the actual African artefacts and objects in Western and African museums for repatriation and restitution opposed to digital archiving in international libraries and museums.
“The position paper or the concept paper justifies that WikiAfrica is an international movement that takes place on the African continent and beyond. It encourages individuals, interested groups and organisations to create, expand and enhance online content about Africa,” he said.
“It started from a collaboration between the Lettera27 Foundation (today the Moleskine foundation) and Wikimedia Italia in 2006 conceptualised the idea and released all its content under creative commons licence to facilitate sharing, innovation and maximise impact.”
Mandangu said African stories told by Africans were still very few and lacked optimisation.
“What has been written about Africa has mainly been written by people from the West. This has created a paucity of information about an entire continent of around a billion people,” he said.
“This results in limiting our understanding of the complexities that exist on such a vast geographical space around such diverse issues as culture, economics, politics, history or contemporary entertainment.”

Follow us on Twitter @NewsDayZimbabwe

BY TENDAI SAUTA
NATIONAL Gallery of Zimbabwe (NGZ) has partnered with AfroCuration to host a hybrid mentorship programme to train youths aged between 18 and 26 how to tell their stories through WikiAfrica, an imitation version of Wikipedia.

In a statement, NGZ spokesperson Zvikomborero Mandangu said the two-day programme, which is open to local youths in colleges and universities, will start on December 9 in Harare and will feature influential speakers from the arts and culture sector.

“The AfroCuration event will focus on coaching young writers and artists to engage in global debate in support of the decolonisation discourse, as it is high time that the African story must be told by Africans,” he said.

“Focus for the AfroCuration workshop will be to mentor these young minds into tackling topical issues like families and community colonial experiences, decolonising education and heritage, nationalism and contemporary art in Zimbabwe, religion and belief systems, Zimbabwean diet, beauty and family.”

Mandangu said the WikiAfrica movement had consistently instigated and led multi-faceted innovative initiatives that had activated communities and driven content to Wikipedia.

“In a way, WikiAfrica will be highly complementary to the Africa scholars who have globally reputable thesis positions, but lack visibility due to lack of effective knowledge transfer mechanisms and efficient information management systems for African bodies of knowledge,” he said.

“The WikiAfrica education programme aims to change and introduce a new generation of editors based in Africa to Wikipedia. While learning about knowledge systems, theory of knowledge and critical thought, the students will also be contributing vital, researched articles that reflect their geographic and social realities.”

Mandangu said the just-ended International Conference on African Culture resolved to retrieve the actual African artefacts and objects in Western and African museums for repatriation and restitution opposed to digital archiving in international libraries and museums.

“The position paper or the concept paper justifies that WikiAfrica is an international movement that takes place on the African continent and beyond. It encourages individuals, interested groups and organisations to create, expand and enhance online content about Africa,” he said.

“It started from a collaboration between the Lettera27 Foundation (today the Moleskine foundation) and Wikimedia Italia in 2006 conceptualised the idea and released all its content under creative commons licence to facilitate sharing, innovation and maximise impact.”

Mandangu said African stories told by Africans were still very few and lacked optimisation.

“What has been written about Africa has mainly been written by people from the West. This has created a paucity of information about an entire continent of around a billion people,” he said.

“This results in limiting our understanding of the complexities that exist on such a vast geographical space around such diverse issues as culture, economics, politics, history or contemporary entertainment.”

  • Follow us on Twitter @NewsDayZimbabwe

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