Connect with us

arts and culture

“TEXTURES” lecture celebrates the history and art of Black hair | Cornell Chronicle – Cornell Chronicle

Sonia Clark’s “Black Hair Flag” is a striking image. The four-foot-tall cloth art piece is painted with the infamous flag of the Confederacy — but stitched into its fabric are the traditional African American hairstyles of the bantu knot and the cornrow, which make up the stars and stripes of the American flag. The piece captures the pain and joy of the African American experience in the building of our nation. 

The juxtaposition in Clark’s art resonated with Tameka Ellington, former assistant dean for the College of the Arts and associate professor at the School of Fashion at Kent State University. “It’s saying that Black people are the reason that our country is so stable, so this country is our country,” Ellington explained.  

The “Black Hair Flag” was one of the many art pieces explored in Ellington’s talk “TEXTURES: the history and art of Black hair” on Sept. 3. The seminar was co-sponsored by Tasha Lewis, associate professor in the Department of Fiber Science & Apparel Design, and was part of the “Fashion & Social Justice” lecture series. 

Ellington presented the lecture at Cornell University’s College of Human Ecology in advance of the Sept. 10 opening of her new exhibition, also called “TEXTURES,” at the Kent State University Museum. The exhibit synthesizes research in history, fashion, art and visual culture to reassess the “hair story” of peoples of African descent and features combs, products and implements alongside works by artists including James Van Der Zee, Sonya Clark and Lorna Simpson. It’s broken into three sections: community and memory, hair politics and Black joy. 

“I wanted to deconstruct the idea of what Black hair means to our society,” Ellington explained.

Ellington said she was motivated to create the exhibit after studying the traumas Black women face with forced assimilation of the White/Western standards of beauty, such as hair straightening and skin lightening.  This ranges from the financial costs and time spent at the salon to health effects like alopecia, or the breakage of hair from constant chemical alteration. The concept of “good hair” being hair that is straighter leads to what Ellington coined “texturism,” or the  idea that Back people with straighter hair are more beautiful, more approachable, more intelligent, etc. 

However, Ellington did not want to showcase Black hair as solely a source of pain. In order to celebrate Black hair in all its dimensions, Ellington and her co-curator, Joseph Underwood, categorized “TEXTURES” into three sections.  

The first, “Community and Memory,” is an homage to the relationship-building nature of hair care. This section includes artifacts such as an Ancient Egyptian figure of two women combing the hair of a child and Annie Lee’s paintings of the Black beauty salon.  

The second, “Hair Politics,” features the “Black Hair Flag” alongside an original Angela Davis wanted poster featuring the civil rights activist’s iconic Afro. 

And finally, there is “Black Joy,” the section that “celebrates self-love and cultural pride.” Among this collection is a diploma from Poro College, the first Black beauty school, and the tools of Willie Morrow, the inventor of the Afro pick and a friend of many prominent civil rights leaders. It also features modern art that portrays Black hair as a cultural centerpiece and as a wonder of structure and architecture.  

“Black hair has been innovative throughout culture,” Ellington said during her lecture. Ellington explained in her talk that the pain and the joy are not mutually exclusive. “TEXTURES” is both a sober acknowledgement of history and a radical ode to one’s natural beauty. As she explained at her talk at Cornell, “TEXTURES” is the celebration of a creativity that has been underappreciated by society for far too long.  

Ellington’s talk was cosponsored by Lewis’s Stephen H. Weiss fellowship, as well as the Central New York Humanities Corridor from an award by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Department of Fiber Science & Apparel Design, the Department of History, The Public History Initiative and the Cornell Fashion + Textile Collection.  

Past speakers in the “Fashion & Social Justice” lecture series include Sabrina Strings, associate professor of sociology at the University of California, Irvine; and Abiola Onabule, a London-based fashion designer with a master’s degree in womenswear from Central Saint Martins. 

Ayesha Chari ’24 is a student media associate in the College of Human Ecology.

Sonia Clark’s “Black Hair Flag” is a striking image. The four-foot-tall cloth art piece is painted with the infamous flag of the Confederacy — but stitched into its fabric are the traditional African American hairstyles of the bantu knot and the cornrow, which make up the stars and stripes of the American flag. The piece captures the pain and joy of the African American experience in the building of our nation. 

The juxtaposition in Clark’s art resonated with Tameka Ellington, former assistant dean for the College of the Arts and associate professor at the School of Fashion at Kent State University. “It’s saying that Black people are the reason that our country is so stable, so this country is our country,” Ellington explained.  

The “Black Hair Flag” was one of the many art pieces explored in Ellington’s talk “TEXTURES: the history and art of Black hair” on Sept. 3. The seminar was co-sponsored by Tasha Lewis, associate professor in the Department of Fiber Science & Apparel Design, and was part of the “Fashion & Social Justice” lecture series. 

Ellington presented the lecture at Cornell University’s College of Human Ecology in advance of the Sept. 10 opening of her new exhibition, also called “TEXTURES,” at the Kent State University Museum. The exhibit synthesizes research in history, fashion, art and visual culture to reassess the “hair story” of peoples of African descent and features combs, products and implements alongside works by artists including James Van Der Zee, Sonya Clark and Lorna Simpson. It’s broken into three sections: community and memory, hair politics and Black joy. 

“I wanted to deconstruct the idea of what Black hair means to our society,” Ellington explained.

Ellington said she was motivated to create the exhibit after studying the traumas Black women face with forced assimilation of the White/Western standards of beauty, such as hair straightening and skin lightening.  This ranges from the financial costs and time spent at the salon to health effects like alopecia, or the breakage of hair from constant chemical alteration. The concept of “good hair” being hair that is straighter leads to what Ellington coined “texturism,” or the  idea that Back people with straighter hair are more beautiful, more approachable, more intelligent, etc. 

However, Ellington did not want to showcase Black hair as solely a source of pain. In order to celebrate Black hair in all its dimensions, Ellington and her co-curator, Joseph Underwood, categorized “TEXTURES” into three sections.  

The first, “Community and Memory,” is an homage to the relationship-building nature of hair care. This section includes artifacts such as an Ancient Egyptian figure of two women combing the hair of a child and Annie Lee’s paintings of the Black beauty salon.  

The second, “Hair Politics,” features the “Black Hair Flag” alongside an original Angela Davis wanted poster featuring the civil rights activist’s iconic Afro. 

And finally, there is “Black Joy,” the section that “celebrates self-love and cultural pride.” Among this collection is a diploma from Poro College, the first Black beauty school, and the tools of Willie Morrow, the inventor of the Afro pick and a friend of many prominent civil rights leaders. It also features modern art that portrays Black hair as a cultural centerpiece and as a wonder of structure and architecture.  

“Black hair has been innovative throughout culture,” Ellington said during her lecture. Ellington explained in her talk that the pain and the joy are not mutually exclusive. “TEXTURES” is both a sober acknowledgement of history and a radical ode to one’s natural beauty. As she explained at her talk at Cornell, “TEXTURES” is the celebration of a creativity that has been underappreciated by society for far too long.  

Ellington’s talk was cosponsored by Lewis’s Stephen H. Weiss fellowship, as well as the Central New York Humanities Corridor from an award by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Department of Fiber Science & Apparel Design, the Department of History, The Public History Initiative and the Cornell Fashion + Textile Collection.  

Past speakers in the “Fashion & Social Justice” lecture series include Sabrina Strings, associate professor of sociology at the University of California, Irvine; and Abiola Onabule, a London-based fashion designer with a master’s degree in womenswear from Central Saint Martins. 

Ayesha Chari 24 is a student media associate in the College of Human Ecology.

Continue Reading

arts and culture

Runsewe hosts diplomatic community to herald 2021 INAC expo – Vanguard

In a strategic bid  to ensure that the 2021 International Arts and Crafts (INAC) Expo meets its desired objectives, the National Council for Arts and Culture (NCAC) played host to the Diplomatic Community in Nigeria to  a Pre-INAC dinner in Abuja.Speaking at the occasion, the Director General, National Council for Arts and Culture Otunba Olusegun Runsewe explained that the purpose of the dinner outing  was to celebrate the Diplomatic Community in Nigeria for their unwavering support to NCAC programmes  and also intimate them of Council’s preparedness to host the 2021 edition of the culture, arts and crafts Expo which will be held under the theme ” Networking Nigerian Crafts to the World”.READ ALSO:APC, Buhari have changed, Fani-Kayode speaks on defectionThe Director General revealed that INAC Expo which was initiated in 2018, is one of Council’s blue chip Cultural tourism promotion offering aimed at recapturing, re- enacting and marketing the essence of the Nigerian Crafts Industry and it’s wealth creation potentials at national and international levels.Other strategic contents  and interventions at  each edition of INAC Expo, Otunba Runsewe further stated, includes  practical workshops and robust exhibitions geared towards  reawakening and energizing the cultural sector towards economic empowerment, information sharing, skills acquisition and  overall socio economic integration of Countries.Runsewe who doubles as the President, World Crafts Council (African Region) maintained  that INAC Expo has helped to sensitize investors on the need to invest in the Arts and Crafts sector as a way of encouraging Enterprenuership and rural communities development which has attracted investors in line with the Social Development Goals ( SDG) agenda of the present administration.The NCAC boss therefore promised the Diplomatic Community that the 14th edition of  INAC Expo 2021 holding from the 13th to the 15th of October  at the Sheraton Hotels and Towers, will once again provide the needed platform for different countries to showcase their indigenous Arts and Crafts through exhibitions , personal and virtual  interactions while savouring the fascinating cultural goldmine  in Nigeria.Highpoint of the evening which was held at the Ladi Kwali hall of Sharaton Hotel and Towers, Abuja was a raffle draw where members of the Diplomatic Community were rewarded with various artistic gift items. There were also goodwill messages from  Ambassadors of various Countries and various stakeholders in the Culture and Tourism sector.The Chief host, Otunba Runsewe presented gifts of appreciation to 25 Countries and stakeholders that attended the event.PIX: Caption: Members of the Diplomatic Community in a group photograph with Otunba Olusegun Runsewe, DG National Council for Arts and Culture & President World Craft Council, African Region Attachments areaRELATED NEWS

In a strategic bid  to ensure that the 2021 International Arts and Crafts (INAC) Expo meets its desired objectives, the National Council for Arts and Culture (NCAC) played host to the Diplomatic Community in Nigeria to  a Pre-INAC dinner in Abuja.

Speaking at the occasion, the Director General, National Council for Arts and Culture Otunba Olusegun Runsewe explained that the purpose of the dinner outing  was to celebrate the Diplomatic Community in Nigeria for their unwavering support to NCAC programmes  and also intimate them of Council’s preparedness to host the 2021 edition of the culture, arts and crafts Expo which will be held under the theme ” Networking Nigerian Crafts to the World”.

READ ALSO:APC, Buhari have changed, Fani-Kayode speaks on defection

The Director General revealed that INAC Expo which was initiated in 2018, is one of Council’s blue chip Cultural tourism promotion offering aimed at recapturing, re- enacting and marketing the essence of the Nigerian Crafts Industry and it’s wealth creation potentials at national and international levels.

Other strategic contents  and interventions at  each edition of INAC Expo, Otunba Runsewe further stated, includes  practical workshops and robust exhibitions geared towards  reawakening and energizing the cultural sector towards economic empowerment, information sharing, skills acquisition and  overall socio economic integration of Countries.

Runsewe who doubles as the President, World Crafts Council (African Region) maintained  that INAC Expo has helped to sensitize investors on the need to invest in the Arts and Crafts sector as a way of encouraging Enterprenuership and rural communities development which has attracted investors in line with the Social Development Goals ( SDG) agenda of the present administration.

The NCAC boss therefore promised the Diplomatic Community that the 14th edition of  INAC Expo 2021 holding from the 13th to the 15th of October  at the Sheraton Hotels and Towers, will once again provide the needed platform for different countries to showcase their indigenous Arts and Crafts through exhibitions , personal and virtual  interactions while savouring the fascinating cultural goldmine  in Nigeria.

Highpoint of the evening which was held at the Ladi Kwali hall of Sharaton Hotel and Towers, Abuja was a raffle draw where members of the Diplomatic Community were rewarded with various artistic gift items. There were also goodwill messages from  Ambassadors of various Countries and various stakeholders in the Culture and Tourism sector.

The Chief host, Otunba Runsewe presented gifts of appreciation to 25 Countries and stakeholders that attended the event.

PIX: Caption: Members of the Diplomatic Community in a group photograph with Otunba Olusegun Runsewe, DG National Council for Arts and Culture & President World Craft Council, African Region

Attachments area

Continue Reading

arts and culture

DOMA to Exhibit Esteemed African-American Art Collection for Public Viewing – Ball State University News

The David Owsley Museum of Art at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana, will exhibit Memories & Inspiration: The Kerry and C. Betty Davis Collection of African American Art, from September 23 through December 22, 2021.
Memories & Inspiration presents more than 60 selected works from a body of art amassed over 35 years by Kerry and C. Betty Davis. Their collection includes works by Romare Bearden, Beverly Buchanan, Elizabeth Catlett, Ernest T. Crichlow, Sam Gilliam, Loïs Mailou Jones, Jacob Lawrence, Gordon Parks, Alma Thomas, and Charles White.
Kerry, a retired mailman, and Betty, a former television news producer, sacrificed many comforts in order to live with extraordinary paintings, drawings, prints, and sculptures. The result of their sacrifices is an eclectic collection of pieces, in various mediums and of differing subjects and styles, by a diverse group of artists of the African Diaspora. These artists—in terms of training, experience, and expression—are unified in their use of cultural and historical narratives. 
This special exhibition was made possible by support from the Friends of the David Owsley Museum of Art; Arts Alive, presented by College of Fine Arts; and the Sursa Fund of the College of Fine Arts at Ball State University.
Memories & Inspiration: The Kerry and C. Betty Davis Collection of African American Art was organized and toured by International Arts & Artists in Washington, D.C.
The David Owsley Museum of Art grants permission to use the exhibition images for the timely publication of the exhibition under the following conditions:

The artwork will not be cropped, detailed, overprinted, or altered; and
Each work will be fully credited with the captions provided in the PDF also in the folder.

About the David Owsley Museum of Art
Free and open to the public, the David Owsley Museum of Art at Ball State University houses a world art collection with over 11,000 works from Africa, Asia, the Pacific Islands, Europe, and the Americas. DOMA cultivates lifelong learning and recreation in the visual arts through exciting interdisciplinary art exhibitions with engaging displays of the permanent collection in an educational environment that serves both the University and the East Central Indiana region.

Website: bsu.edu/DOMA
Location: 2021 W. Riverside Avenue, Muncie, Indiana
Visitor hours: Tuesday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.

Parking is available at the McKinley Parking Garage, and MITS bus stops are nearby. DOMA is in the Fine Arts Building on the northern side of Ball State University’s Quad. For more information, call the museum at 765-285-5242 or email artmuseum@bsu.edu.
About The Davis Collection
Kerry Davis, a native of Atlanta, Georgia, is a former sergeant of the United States Air Force, a retired carrier with the United States Postal Service, and an ordained deacon. He began collecting in the mid-1980s in partnership with his wife, Betty, who shared his passion for art. Begun originally with the modest aim of enhancing the interior decor of their mid-century split-level home in suburban Atlanta, the Davises’ collection has grown to over 300 works by some of the most distinguished African American artists of the twentieth century.
Inspired by previous generations of African American art collectors, who understood the importance of preserving cultural expression, memory, and imagery, Davis has sought to contribute to this legacy and be a source of inspiration for others in the community. The Davis residence—dubbed an “In-Home Museum” by visiting neighbors, parishioners, and friends—serves as a meeting place and cultural hub for artists, collectors, and art enthusiasts. Kerry and Betty have two children and one granddaughter.
International Arts & Artists in Washington, D.C., is a nonprofit arts service organization dedicated to increasing cross-cultural understanding and exposure to the arts internationally, through exhibitions, programs and services to artists, arts institutions, and the public. Visit ArtsandArtists.org.
About Ball State
Founded in 1918 and located in Muncie, Ball State University is one of Indiana’s premier universities and an economic driver for the state. Ball State’s 21,600 students come from all over Indiana, the nation, and the world. The 790-acre campus is large enough to accommodate first-rate facilities and 19 NCAA Division I sports, but our welcoming and inclusive campus is small enough to ensure the friendliness, personal attention, and access that are the hallmarks of the University. Destination 2040: Our Flight Path establishes Ball State’s ambitious goals for our second century. We Fly!
Follow Ball State University:

The David Owsley Museum of Art at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana, will exhibit Memories & Inspiration: The Kerry and C. Betty Davis Collection of African American Art, from September 23 through December 22, 2021.

Memories & Inspiration presents more than 60 selected works from a body of art amassed over 35 years by Kerry and C. Betty Davis. Their collection includes works by Romare Bearden, Beverly Buchanan, Elizabeth Catlett, Ernest T. Crichlow, Sam Gilliam, Loïs Mailou Jones, Jacob Lawrence, Gordon Parks, Alma Thomas, and Charles White.

Kerry, a retired mailman, and Betty, a former television news producer, sacrificed many comforts in order to live with extraordinary paintings, drawings, prints, and sculptures. The result of their sacrifices is an eclectic collection of pieces, in various mediums and of differing subjects and styles, by a diverse group of artists of the African Diaspora. These artists—in terms of training, experience, and expression—are unified in their use of cultural and historical narratives. 

This special exhibition was made possible by support from the Friends of the David Owsley Museum of Art; Arts Alive, presented by College of Fine Arts; and the Sursa Fund of the College of Fine Arts at Ball State University.

Memories & Inspiration: The Kerry and C. Betty Davis Collection of African American Art was organized and toured by International Arts & Artists in Washington, D.C.

The David Owsley Museum of Art grants permission to use the exhibition images for the timely publication of the exhibition under the following conditions:

  • The artwork will not be cropped, detailed, overprinted, or altered; and
  • Each work will be fully credited with the captions provided in the PDF also in the folder.

About the David Owsley Museum of Art

Free and open to the public, the David Owsley Museum of Art at Ball State University houses a world art collection with over 11,000 works from Africa, Asia, the Pacific Islands, Europe, and the Americas. DOMA cultivates lifelong learning and recreation in the visual arts through exciting interdisciplinary art exhibitions with engaging displays of the permanent collection in an educational environment that serves both the University and the East Central Indiana region.

  • Website: bsu.edu/DOMA
  • Location: 2021 W. Riverside Avenue, Muncie, Indiana
  • Visitor hours: Tuesday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.

Parking is available at the McKinley Parking Garage, and MITS bus stops are nearby. DOMA is in the Fine Arts Building on the northern side of Ball State University’s Quad. For more information, call the museum at 765-285-5242 or email artmuseum@bsu.edu.

About The Davis Collection

Kerry Davis, a native of Atlanta, Georgia, is a former sergeant of the United States Air Force, a retired carrier with the United States Postal Service, and an ordained deacon. He began collecting in the mid-1980s in partnership with his wife, Betty, who shared his passion for art. Begun originally with the modest aim of enhancing the interior decor of their mid-century split-level home in suburban Atlanta, the Davises’ collection has grown to over 300 works by some of the most distinguished African American artists of the twentieth century.

Inspired by previous generations of African American art collectors, who understood the importance of preserving cultural expression, memory, and imagery, Davis has sought to contribute to this legacy and be a source of inspiration for others in the community. The Davis residence—dubbed an “In-Home Museum” by visiting neighbors, parishioners, and friends—serves as a meeting place and cultural hub for artists, collectors, and art enthusiasts. Kerry and Betty have two children and one granddaughter.

International Arts & Artists in Washington, D.C., is a nonprofit arts service organization dedicated to increasing cross-cultural understanding and exposure to the arts internationally, through exhibitions, programs and services to artists, arts institutions, and the public. Visit ArtsandArtists.org.

About Ball State

Founded in 1918 and located in Muncie, Ball State University is one of Indiana’s premier universities and an economic driver for the state. Ball State’s 21,600 students come from all over Indiana, the nation, and the world. The 790-acre campus is large enough to accommodate first-rate facilities and 19 NCAA Division I sports, but our welcoming and inclusive campus is small enough to ensure the friendliness, personal attention, and access that are the hallmarks of the University. Destination 2040: Our Flight Path establishes Ball State’s ambitious goals for our second century. We Fly!

Follow Ball State University:

Continue Reading

arts and culture

Black Master Storytellers Festival to celebrate Black joy – MSR News Online

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Reddit
Email
Print

Submitted photos (l-r, top-bottom) Jan Blake, Nothando Zulu, Vusi and Nothando Zulu, Danielle Daniel, Nunn Above, Gwen Matthews and Robert “Eddie” Robinson

This year’s fest will be virtual

This year’s 31st annual Black Master Storytellers Festival, to be held Sept. 24 and 25 at 6 pm, will be held virtually. The theme for the event is “Black Joy: Stories Celebrating Hope, Resilience & Love.”

“It has been through storytelling, which has expressed our feelings, our thoughts, and responses to our lived experiences, that Minnesota’s Black Storytellers Alliance has kept Black stories alive for 31 years—through the Black Master Storytellers Festival,” said Titilayo Bediako, executive director of the WE WIN INSTITUTE. The festival is a veritable collage of great storytelling and great music.

The event will feature skilled storytellers from around the world, using the richness of oral traditions to evoke images in the mind’s eye that brings the rich African American experience to life. 

Storytellers use song, dance, drumming, music as well as “call and response” to share the splendor of African and African American history and culture.

“In these times when the onslaught of trauma seems to never end, this is an opportunity for the entire family to enjoy the power of inspiring stories and uplifting songs,” said local renowned storyteller Vusi Zulu.

The griot, or storyteller, is one of the oldest traditions in Africa.

According to organizers, Black folks, even in the diaspora, are oral people who have used storytelling as a way of passing on African traditions, values, and behaviors, and as a way of preserving the culture. 

Each evening will include a different master storyteller interspersed with music from Minnesota’s own national recording artists, including Gwen Matthews, Robert “Eddie” Robinson, and Nunn Above.

This year’s storytellers are Jan Blake, London, UK; Mama Linda Goss, Baltimore, MD; Dylan Pritchett, Richmond, VA; Toni Simmons, Dallas, TX; Atiba Kwabena Wilson, Harlem, NY; Lyn Ford, Columbus, OH; Mitch Capel (Gran’DaddY June Bug) Southern Pines, North Carolina; Elisha Minter, Charlotte, NC; Chetter Galloway, Atlanta, GA; Danielle Daniel, St. Paul, MN; Kristie Lazenberry, Coon Rapids, MN, and Joshua Cheo Gillespie, Minneapolis, MN.

The Black Master Storytellers Festival is made possible through a grant from the Metropolitan Regional Arts Council, as a result of the legislative appropriation from the arts and cultural heritage fund.

All events are free and include American Sign Language Interpreters and are family-friendly.

 For more info, call 612-529-5864 or email:nzulu@blackstorytellers.com or visit the website www.blackstorytellers.com.






Black Storytellers Festival
Submitted photos (l-r, top-bottom) Jan Blake, Nothando Zulu, Vusi and Nothando Zulu, Danielle Daniel, Nunn Above, Gwen Matthews and Robert “Eddie” Robinson

This year’s fest will be virtual

This year’s 31st annual Black Master Storytellers Festival, to be held Sept. 24 and 25 at 6 pm, will be held virtually. The theme for the event is “Black Joy: Stories Celebrating Hope, Resilience & Love.”

“It has been through storytelling, which has expressed our feelings, our thoughts, and responses to our lived experiences, that Minnesota’s Black Storytellers Alliance has kept Black stories alive for 31 years—through the Black Master Storytellers Festival,” said Titilayo Bediako, executive director of the WE WIN INSTITUTE. The festival is a veritable collage of great storytelling and great music.

The event will feature skilled storytellers from around the world, using the richness of oral traditions to evoke images in the mind’s eye that brings the rich African American experience to life. 

Storytellers use song, dance, drumming, music as well as “call and response” to share the splendor of African and African American history and culture.

“In these times when the onslaught of trauma seems to never end, this is an opportunity for the entire family to enjoy the power of inspiring stories and uplifting songs,” said local renowned storyteller Vusi Zulu.

The griot, or storyteller, is one of the oldest traditions in Africa.

According to organizers, Black folks, even in the diaspora, are oral people who have used storytelling as a way of passing on African traditions, values, and behaviors, and as a way of preserving the culture. 

Each evening will include a different master storyteller interspersed with music from Minnesota’s own national recording artists, including Gwen Matthews, Robert “Eddie” Robinson, and Nunn Above.

This year’s storytellers are Jan Blake, London, UK; Mama Linda Goss, Baltimore, MD; Dylan Pritchett, Richmond, VA; Toni Simmons, Dallas, TX; Atiba Kwabena Wilson, Harlem, NY; Lyn Ford, Columbus, OH; Mitch Capel (Gran’DaddY June Bug) Southern Pines, North Carolina; Elisha Minter, Charlotte, NC; Chetter Galloway, Atlanta, GA; Danielle Daniel, St. Paul, MN; Kristie Lazenberry, Coon Rapids, MN, and Joshua Cheo Gillespie, Minneapolis, MN.

The Black Master Storytellers Festival is made possible through a grant from the Metropolitan Regional Arts Council, as a result of the legislative appropriation from the arts and cultural heritage fund.

All events are free and include American Sign Language Interpreters and are family-friendly.

 For more info, call 612-529-5864 or email:nzulu@blackstorytellers.com or visit the website www.blackstorytellers.com.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Stand Out From The Crowd - A Marketing Tip By ZimMarket

 

 

Stand Out From The Crowd

If you happen to be in business and you are not well conversant with the 4 P’s of Marketing, then you are likely to dismally fail, sooner rather than later. In modern day business, the 4 P’s are the traditional and universal cornerstones of Marketing, which are inextricably interrelated. In Marketing, for anything you are selling to be highly competitive, in any given market, it must be, the right Product or service, being offered at the right Place, selling at the right Price, using the right Promotional Marketing Mix. In this marketing tip, I am briefly going to solely dwell on the Promotion aspect, which is an equally significant component of the 4 P’s of the Marketing Mix When you offer products on the market, you must ensure that you adequately educate your potential, as well as your target market, so that your products will become very intimately known and easily identifiable by your customers, from a myriad of other competing products and services on sale. It goes without saying, that this is why your product must “Stand Out From The Crowd”, for your business to remain relevant, lest it will be driven into oblivion. In today's cut-throat marketing competition, you may only achieve to “Stand Out From The Crowd” through an objective, deliberate, persistent, and aggressive marketing strategy, which not only includes mainstream media marketing but also incorporates Online Advertising. This is where, 1Zimbabwe Classifieds | ZimMarket enters into your Marketing Mix, by providing you, the Online advertising medium, in the form of FREE advertising space, on our ZimMarket Classifieds: www.1zimbabweclassifieds.co.zw The old adage says, “Gone are the days when one would say “A Good Wine Needs No Bush”. That’s Why, Coca-Cola, of all Companies in the world, is still advertising to this day

We are there for you, it is our business tradition, to link buyers to sellers.

www.1zimbabweclassifieds.co.zw

www.1africaclassifieds.com

www.1southafricaclassifieds.com

www.1usaclassifieds.com

General inquiries : Info@1zimbabweclassifieds.co.zw

Technical Support: admin@1zimbabweclassifieds.co.zw

One Zimbabwe Market Classifieds | ZimMarket

Linking Buyers To Sellers Is Our Business Tradition

Published By The Founder & Managing Director Of: ZimMarket Digital Technologies Inc. : 

 Joel Masuka

Trending

Copyright © 2021 1Africa Focus.

www.1africafocus.com

One Zimbabwe Classifieds | ZimMarket

www.1zimbabweclassifieds.co.zw

www.1southafricaclassifieds.com

www.1africaclassifieds.com

www.1usaclassifieds.com

www.computertraining.co.zw/

www.1itonlinetraining.com/

Zimbabwe Market Classifieds | ZimMarket

1 Zimbabwe Market Classifieds | ZimMarket

www.1zimlegends.com

Linking Buyers To Sellers Is Our Business Tradition

www.www.adei.online